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Dennis Whittlesey: Dry Creek Rancheria takes hit from rival casino


Filed Under: California | Openings and Closings | Opinion
More on: dry creek, graton
   
Attorney Dennis J. Whittlesey says the glory days are over for the Dry Creek Rancheria of California now that the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria are in the gaming business:
Location, location, location is a well-established mantra in the real estate business. Tribal casinos are not exempt – particularly in California, where tribal casinos are a dominating influence in the state's gaming industry (card rooms being the other major gaming industry). The impact of the Graton Resort & Casino in Rohnert Park, California, on the River Rock Casino on the Dry Creek Rancheria is a case on point. The River Rock Casino is some six miles west of the Geyserville, California, exit on U.S. Highway 101 on a two-lane road and up a narrow driveway to the top of a hill overlooking the Alexander Valley wine country. While the setting offers sensational views, it is not easy to get to. However, for 12 years it was the only casino in its service area. As a result, its location was of little significance until the Graton casino opened last November.

Geyserville is some 30 miles north of the Graton casino in Rohnert Park, meaning that the Graton casino is more convenient to people in the high population areas of Marin County and San Francisco to the south. The Graton casino and resort also offers many drinking and dining venues – including several restaurants opened by celebrity chefs from the Bay area, as well as a resort hotel and extensive gaming stations throughout the property. And patrons save at least 40 minutes' drive time each way on the multi-lane U.S. Highway 101, which Graton directly abuts. The impact of Graton on River Rock has been significant. It reinforces the need to include in long-range planning for casino development the three key ingredients for any project placement: "location, location, location."

Prior to the Graton grand opening this past November, the Dry Creek Pomo enjoyed a 12-year monopoly on gaming in the immediate vicinity and had the closest Highway 101 gaming facility to Marin County and San Francisco. During that time, the casino was so prosperous that the Tribe was making per capita payments in amounts reported to be $600 monthly to each of its 640 tribal members, who previously had little economic opportunity. The revenues for 2010 (the last year for which financial data is available) were reported to be $124 million, and River Rock employed more than 600 people. The Tribe itself had more than 60 full-time employees.

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Dennis J. Whittlesey: CASINO LOCATION IMPACTS LONG-TERM SUCCESS (Mondaq.Com 4/1)
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Dry Creek Rancheria sees big drop after nearby casino opens (03/19)

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