Arts & Entertainment | Education

Column: Agua Caliente Band revives plans for new museum





The Agua Caliente Cultural Museum, owned by the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, has big plans for a new facility:
The Agua Caliente Tribe of Cahuilla Indians hailed nature as a source of a spiritual presence. The earth was a most important aspect in their lives, as were the waters and the majestic mountains and skies. Much of the Agua Caliente culture originates from nature, such as the story of the Blue Frog and the traditional “bird songs” that have been passed down though the generations. Intricate basket-weaving is celebrated today in exhibitions throughout the valley—part of a treasure trove secured by the Agua Caliente Cultural Museum.

To learn about and be enriched by Agua Caliente culture, there is no place better than this museum, currently situated at 219 S. Palm Canyon Drive.

I recently met with Michael Hammond, the executive director of the museum since 1999, and Steve Sharp, the director of development. Under their leadership, the museum has preserved and documented thousands of cultural treasures for the tribe.

About a decade ago, the ACCM became a part of the prestigious Smithsonian Institution Affiliations Program; it is the first Native American museum to be part of this group. The designation allows the museum to draw from the many programs and resources offered by the Smithsonian in technology, programming and exhibitions.

Get the Story:
Richard Almada: Desert Arts: The Directors of the Agua Caliente Cultural Museum Have Big Plans (The Coachella Valley Independent 9/10)