your internet resource on facebook on twitter on Google+ on soundcloud
phone: 202 630 8439
The University of Tulsa College of Law - Master's in Indian Law
Advertise on Indianz.Com
Home > News > Headlines
Print   Subscribe
Julianne Jennings: Tools of conquest are still being used today

Filed Under: Opinion
More on: blood quantum, julianne jennings, race, wars

Benjamin Church, who led wars against tribes in New England in the 1600s. Photo in the public domain

Julianne Jennings reflects a chance meeting with a descendant of a military officer who led war against New England tribes in the 17th century:
In order to move forward, we cannot continue to rage against past transgressions, for it only leads to self-victimization. History tells us that Native American populations dramatically declined over the past centuries because of the myth that people with certain phenotypes are less human or “civilized.” Previous case studies on mixed-race groups for example, the Narragansett, Pequot, Wamapanoag as well as individual accounts echo the pervasiveness of discrimination. If we shift our focus from our rigid, narrow and habitual points of view, we will embrace situations in new ways so that they become more workable.

It is critical to understand that the conquest of the natives of this country was based on a chain of flawed thinking: first being religion, where 15th century documents, such as the papal bulls, show the papacy played a role in the genocidal onslaught that impacted millions of indigenous people. Early explorers and then conquerors brought diseases and then guns, enslavement, land-grabs, racial discrimination and re-education. Many of these tools of conquest were and still are, being used today.

When presenting this writing I was asked, “How come the voices of certain Elders were not present in the text?” My response was “the old regime was cloaked in anger and resentment and had to be overthrown.” An exhibit at Plimoth Plantation called “Irreconcilable Differences” is an example of the rage that perpetuates a “where-to-when” everybody got stuck. Another example comes from one of our communities most prominent Indian scholars “ If you don’t marry your own people you will disappear,” signifies they too have bought into classifying people by blood and not by culture. My grandmother’s reasons for remaining silent about her identity also exemplify a conquered mind, a path I was destined to walk.

Get the Story:
Julianne Jennings: 'I Have the Blood of Kings and Queens in My Veins' (Indian Country Today 6/16)

Copyright © Indianz.Com
More headlines...
Stay Connected:
On Facebook

On Twitter

On Google+

On SoundCloud
Local Links:
Federal Register | Indian Gaming | Jobs & Notices | In The Hoop | Message Board
Latest News:
Democracy Now: Dakota Access security guards weren't licensed (10/27)
Lakota Country Times: Pine Ridge youth center stresses safety (10/27)
Dana Lone Hill: Indian people won't stop fighting for our rights (10/27)
Steven Newcomb: Reconciliation means covering up the truth (10/27)
The Sioux Chef on track to open indigenous restaurant in 2017 (10/27)
Jury restarts deliberations in armed standoff on tribal territory (10/27)
Native youth pressure Hillary Clinton to take a #NoDAPL stand (10/26)
Native candidate in South Dakota gets a big boost from Obama (10/26)
Landowners from Bad River Band see $6.6M in buy-back offers (10/26)
Navajo Nation lawmaker warns further action needed on hemp (10/26)
Former Obama administration official joins Native owned firm (10/26)
Justice Department opens criminal databases to more tribes (10/26)
Mark Trahant: Native candidates for Congress in final stretch (10/26)
Lakota Country Times: Oglala Sioux Tribe reacts to shootings (10/26)
Native Sun News Today: Pine Ridge football team impresses (10/26)
Brandon Ecoffey: Strong fixes needed for reservation crime (10/26)
Raúl Grijalva: Republicans still won't listen to Indian Country (10/26)
Steve Russell: The magic of Donald Trump's 'plan' for America (10/26)
Harlan McKosato: Film pays tribute to 'warrior' Elouise Cobell (10/26)
Haskell University expelled student who was victim of assault (10/26)
Jury deliberates verdicts in armed standoff on tribal territory (10/26)
Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribe gets court date in gaming lawsuit (10/26)
Tule River Tribe gains support for moving casino to a new site (10/26)
First Nations casino in Saskatchewan pays out $1.5M jackpot (10/26)
Dakota Access ramps up spending on lobbying and politicians (10/25)
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe presses Obama on Dakota Access (10/25)
Indian National Finals Rodeo gears up for big crowds in Vegas (10/25)
Mark Trahant: Native candidates benefit from Clinton landslide (10/25)
Lakota Country Times: Shooting pushes Pine Ridge into action (10/25)
Native Sun News Today: Sisters want police help for stolen car (10/25)
Delphine Red Shirt: Teach the language like our elders wanted (10/25)
Jeffrey Whalen: Oglala Sioux Tribe keeps making bad decisions (10/25)
Cronkite News: Fighting the opioid epidemic in Indian Country (10/25)
Harlan McKosato: Just what are Indians supposed to look like? (10/25)
ICT series continues with George W. Bush's sovereignty gaffe (10/25)
United South and Eastern Tribes open sovereignty conference (10/25)
Navajo Nation in discussions to cultivate hemp on reservation (10/25)
Eastern Cherokees looking to build data center on reservation (10/25)
Cherokee Nation schedules job fairs for newest gaming facility (10/25)
California Nations Indian Gaming Association chooses director (10/25)
Alabama-Coushatta Tribe faces legal fight over modest casino (10/25)
more headlines...

Home | Arts & Entertainment | Business | Canada | Cobell Lawsuit | Education | Environment | Federal Recognition | Federal Register | Forum | Health | Humor | Indian Gaming | Indian Trust | Jack Abramoff Scandal | Jobs & Notices | Law | National | News | Opinion | Politics | Sports | Technology | World

Indianz.Com Terms of Service | Indianz.Com Privacy Policy
About Indianz.Com | Advertise on Indianz.Com

Indianz.Com is a product of Noble Savage Media, LLC and Ho-Chunk, Inc.