Business | Environment | National

Navajo Nation tourism proposal in Grand Canyon stirs controversy






Artist's rendering of a tram to the bottom of the Grand Canyon. Image from Grand Canyon Escalade

The Navajo Nation hasn't officially approved it but a tourism project in the Grand Canyon National Park is stirring controversy on and off the reservation.

The $150 million Grand Canyon Escalade includes a tramway that will carry tourists to the floor of the park. The developer touts jobs and revenues that will be created by the project.

But some tribal members say the project will harm sacred sites in the canyon. And the National Park Service says the tribe doesn't have authority over the land where the tramway would end.

The developer anticipates a 2018 opening in order to resolve legal issues over the boundary of the park and the boundary of the reservation.


Save the Confluence opposes development plans in the Grand Canyon. Photo from STC

Get the Story:
Grand Canyon cable-car project ignites controversy over sacred land, economic impact (The Arizona Republic 9/4)
Navajo Nation at odds over Grand Canyon Escalade project (The Arizona Republic 9/4)
Dispute over land rights could sink Grand Canyon Escalade project (The Arizona Republic 9/4)
Will Grand Canyon Escalade project brings jobs to Navajo Nation? (The Arizona Republic 9/4)

Related Stories:
NPR: Grand Canyon developer says plan won't harm sacred sites (08/05)
NPS worried about Navajo Nation's Grand Canyon tourism plans (07/07)
Native Sun News: Opposition to Grand Canyon tourist project (06/10)
Navajo community divided on Grand Canyon tourist attractionm (11/29)
Hopi Tribe passes resolution opposing Navajo Nation business (10/10)
Navajo Nation sees opposition to Grand Canyon tourism project (7/31)