Canada | Health

Second switched at birth case uncovered at First Nation hospital






An aerial view of the Nelson River near Norway House in Manitoba. Photo by US Embassy Canada

A second switched at birth case has been uncovered at a Native hospital in Manitoba.

Leon Swanson and David Tait Jr. were born days apart in early 1975 at the Norway House Indian Hospital, a health facility run by the Canadian government. They grew up as friends but only just discovered that they were raised by the each other's biological families.

"It's shocking," Samantha Folster, a council member from the Norway House Cree Nation, where the men reside, told CBC News. "It's devastating for the families."

Last November, two men from the nearby Garden Hill First Nation discovered they had been switched at birth at the same hospital. Luke Monias and Norman Barkman were born days apart in June 1975.

After that first case made the news, the Canadian government vowed to investigate. Health Minister Jane Philpott is again promising to find some answers.

"Cases like this are an unfortunate reminder to Canadians of how urgent the need is to provide all Indigenous people with high-quality health care," Philpott said in a statement quoted by CBC News. "The government of Canada remains deeply committed to renewing a nation-to-nation relationship with all Indigenous peoples. I offer my sympathy to the families in this difficult time."

Read More on the Story:
Canada orders independent probe of switched-at-birth case (AP 8/29)
Manitoba men weep after learning they were switched at birth 41 years ago (CBC 8/26)
Switched at birth by federally-run hospital: Manitoba men learn they were raised by the wrong parents (CP 8/26)
Second switched-at-birth case discovered at Norway House Indian Hospital (CBC 8/25)