The "Chief Wahoo" logo of the Cleveland professional baseball team. Image by Charlie Lyons-Pardue
Canada | Law | Sports

Native architect in Canada loses complaint against racist mascot





Famed Native architect Douglas Cardinal lost his human rights complaint against the racist mascot of the Cleveland professional baseball team.

Cardinal wanted the team's name and imagery banned in Ontario because they depict Native people in a stereotypical and offensive manner. But Superior Court Justice Tom McEwen dismissed the complaint on Monday after a hearing that was attended by at least 27 lawyers, the Associated Press reported.

“You could not call a team the New York Jews. Why is it OK to call a team the Cleveland Indians?” attorney Monique Jilesen, who represented Cardinal, said in court, the AP reported.

Cardinal, whose initial design was used for the National Museum of the American Indian, is of Blackfoot and Ojibwe ancestry.

Read More on the Story:
Ontario judge dismisses attempt to ban Indians’ name, logo (AP 10/17)
Ontario judge dismisses bid to ban Cleveland Indians name, logo (The Toronto Sun 10/17)
Canadian judge rules Cleveland Indians can use name, Chief Wahoo logo in Toronto ALCS games (The Cleveland Plain-Dealer 10/17)

Related Stories:
Native architect in Canada files complaint over racist mascot (10/17)
John Guenther: Racist mascots aren't an honor for Native people (06/16)
Ed Rice: Cleveland team comes up with excuse for racist mascot (04/24)
Mary Pember: Activists protest opening day for Cleveland team (04/13)
Ed Rice: Honoring a true Cleveland Indian -- Louis Sockalexis (09/23)
Indian activists in Cleveland to file suit against baseball team (06/24)
Jacqueline Keeler: Racist name haunts urban Indian community (04/14)
Lalo Alcaraz: 2002 cartoon foretold 'Chief Wahoo' confrontation (04/09)
Opinion: New movement takes 'Chief Wahoo' out of team's gear (04/03)
Activists to rally against 'Chief Wahoo' mascot at opening game (04/02)