Home > News > More Headlines > Conn. tribe loses second shot at federal status
Printer friendly version
Conn. tribe loses second shot at federal status
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2003

The Bureau of Indian Affairs on Tuesday announced plans to deny recognition to a Connecticut tribe whose earlier attempt to gain federal status was thwarted, and then revived, by the Clinton administration.

Aurene Martin, the acting assistant secretary for Indian affairs, said the Golden Hill Paugussett Tribe of Connecticut failed to satisfy the criteria for recognition. Government researchers found a lack of evidence in three out of seven categories, including descent from an historic Indian nation, political influence and continuous existence.

"Since 1823, the evidence shows that the historical Golden Hill Indians ceased to exist as a distinct community," a statement released by the BIA said.

The decision, which is only preliminary, is the second blow the BIA has delivered to the state-recognized tribe. In 1996, former assistant secretary Ada Deer rejected the tribe's petition, citing the genealogical issue.

But three years later, the tribe was given another chance to prove its case. The record was reopened to fully address what Quiet Hawk, the Paugussett chief otherwise known as Aurelius H. Piper Jr., yesterday said was 350 years of history.

"This is disappointing," he said yesterday, "but we will move to fully address the technical question cited by the Bureau of Indian Affairs."

More welcoming was Connecticut attorney general Richard Blumenthal, who has opposed tribes on a number of issues. "This decision is a victory for the public interest, upholding the law and facts, and reaffirming the BIA's 1996 final determination denying recognition to the Golden Hill group," he said. "As we have consistently contended, this petition fails to meet several key mandatory criteria established by law for federal recognition."

The 300-member Paugussett Tribe, which has a one-quarter acre reservation, is one of several in Connecticut that has sought federal recognition and the benefits, such as housing and health care, associated with that status. State law affords most attributes of self-determination, such as freedom from taxation and the right to determine membership, but Republicans are moving to repeal it.

The tribe has been up front about its plans to build a casino in economically-depressed Bridgeport, whose officials have welcomed the idea and whose residents have started a support group. Without federal status, though, gaming is impossible.

Also at stake are claims to as much as 10,000 acres of land in southern New England. Those lawsuits were put on hold pending the outcome of the recognition question and are likely to be dismissed once the BIA decision is final.

Document fully explaining the BIA's reasoning were not available yesterday. The BIA will publish a notice of its decision in the Federal Register within the coming days, triggering 180 days of public comment, to be followed by two-month period during which the tribe can make additional arguments and respond to issues raised.

"We've always perceived this not to be the end of the road," said Michael O'Connell, an attorney for the tribe, "but rather one of the steps in the long road."

Relevant Links:
Golden Hill Paugussett Tribe - http://paugussett.itgo.com
Friends of the Golden Hill Paugussett Tribe - http://www.paugussetts.com

Related Stories:
BIA declines recognition of Paugussett Tribe (1/21)
BIA to issue decision on Paugussett recognition (1/21)
State recognized tribe inks casino deal (12/20)
Conn. lawmaker wants recognition revoked (12/12)
Bill would terminate state tribes (12/11)
Conn. city will negotiate with tribe (12/03)
Conn. tribe awaits recognition decision (11/11)
Conn. tribe gets support on casino (11/7)
Support plenty for tribal casino (10/17)
Conn. tribe withdraws casino deal (10/16)
Conn. tribe disputes casino study (09/27)
Tribe threatens land claims over casino (9/19)
Conn. tribe would settle land claim (8/12)
Conn. tribe pins hopes on casino (7/19)
Friends of tribe rally for casino (7/18)
Survey finds support for tribal casino (5/13)
Rival Paugussett group locked out (4/30)
Mohegan official doubts recognitions (1/30)
Recognition hearing next week (1/29)
Editorial: Praise on recognition push (1/28)
Hearings on recognition bill planned (1/16)
Man claims true leader of Conn. tribe (1/14)

Copyright © Indianz.Com

Stay Connected

On Facebook

On Twitter

On Google+

On SoundCloud

More Headlines

Obama seeks another increase for Indian Health Service budget (2/10)
Six of 12 Indian Health Service area directors in 'acting' capacity (2/10)
Lakota Country Times: Indian lawmakers oppose drug testing bill (2/10)
Vince Two Eagles: The rez of the story about treaty-making in US (2/10)
Kristi Noem: Indian Health Service remains in state of emergency (2/10)
Chase Iron Eyes: Real sovereigns don't disenroll their own people (2/10)
Gyasi Ross: African and Native Americans fought for their survival (2/10)
Albert Bender: Tribes should reclaim land from unratified treaties (2/10)
John Lavelle: Supreme Court weighs key tribal sovereignty issue (2/10)
Women take top three leadership positions at Menominee Nation (2/10)
Northern Arapaho Tribe seeking to repatriate remains of students (2/10)
White Mountain Apache Tribe considers change to blood quantum (2/10)
Blackfeet Nation citizens still talking about constitutional reforms (2/10)
Sweat lodge at Army post helps with PTSD treatment for veterans (2/10)
Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes welcome return of land (2/10)
Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders win big in New Hampshire vote (2/10)
Prairie Island Indian Community unveils $19M gaming expansion (2/10)
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community approves upgrades at casinos (2/10)
Seminole Tribe's gaming compact takes a step forward in Florida (2/10)
Schaghticoke Tribal Nation insists on pursuing Connecticut casino (2/10)
National campaign launched to stop tribal disenrollment epidemic (2/9)
President Obama seeks $2.9B budget for Bureau of Indian Affairs (2/9)
Office of Special Trustee budget request remains steady at $140M (2/9)
Bureau of Reclamation emphasizes tribal water rights settlements (2/9)
Lakota Country Times: Indian health at center of Medicaid debate (2/9)
Mark Trahant: Native candidates fall behind in the big money wars (2/9)
Vi Waln: Arrogance keeps Keystone XL plans alive in South Dakota (2/9)
Charles Kader: Haudenosaunee territory will always be Indian land (2/9)
Mike Myers: Indigenous teachings still guide our ways of life today (2/9)
Albuquerque Indian Center faces closure without additional money (2/9)
Leader of Bois Forte Band promises fight against substance abuse (2/9)
Coushatta Tribe wins ruling in long-running dispute with contractor (2/9)
Pamunkey Tribe looks to a stronger future with federal recognition (2/9)
Isle de Jean Charles Band to relocate with help of $48M HUD grant (2/9)
Nambe Pueblo hopes small casino stands out in a crowded market (2/9)
St. Regis Mohawk Tribe sends fewer gaming funds to communities (2/9)
Tribes in Connecticut still working on process for potential casino (2/9)
Girls basketball team proudly wears Navajo hairstyle during game (2/8)
National Indian Gaming Commission slated to get a third member (2/8)
Senate committee to host roundtable on Tribal Law and Order Act (2/8)
Senate Indian Affairs Committee postpones field hearing into EPA (2/8)
Senate designates National Tribal Colleges and Universities Week (2/8)
Bill John Baker: Cherokee Nation invests in our people's wellbeing (2/8)
Kevin Washburn: Republicans punish tribe in public lands measure (2/8)
Harold Monteau: Democrats stack the deck for only one candidate (2/8)
Cutcha Risling Baldy: Don't let Leonard Peltier die in prison system (2/8)
more headlines...

Advertisement

Home | Arts & Entertainment | Business | Canada | Cobell Lawsuit | Education | Environment | Federal Recognition | Federal Register | Forum | Health | Humor | Indian Gaming | Indian Trust | Jack Abramoff Scandal | Jobs & Notices | Law | National | News | Opinion | Politics | Sports | Technology | World

Indianz.Com Terms of Service | Indianz.Com Privacy Policy
About Indianz.Com | Advertise on Indianz.Com

Indianz.Com is a product of Noble Savage Media, LLC and Ho-Chunk, Inc.