Home > News > More Headlines > List highlights threats to sacred and historic sites
Printer friendly version
List highlights threats to sacred and historic sites
FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2003

A lake in New Mexico held as sacred by several tribes and an area in Georgia known as the cradle of Muscogee civilization were named two of the nation's most endangered places on Thursday.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation's annual list of threatened sites was a diverse mix that included an airport terminal in New York, a Revolutionary battleground in Massachusetts and a bridge in Kansas. What they all have in common is their irreplaceable contribution to America's history, said Peter Brink, a senior vice president for the organization.

"The list is a wake-up call for all of us to realize that some of our most important cultural resources are in trouble," Brink said in Washington, D.C.

For the Zuni Salt Lake and Sanctuary Zone in western New Mexico, the threat is an 18,000-acre coal mine that was approved by the Bush administration last summer. Although Secretary of Interior Gale Norton imposed some limits on water needed for project, tribes in the area believe the lake, used to collect salt for ceremonial uses, will be destroyed.

The Zuni Tribe is leading opposition to the mine and is joined by other tribes in the Southwest. To support the efforts, the Trust is calling on Salt River Project, an Arizona utility company, to drop its proposal and for Norton to re-examine her approval.

In Georgia, a proposed highway development is cited as a danger to the Ocmulgee Old Fields in Georgia, an area the Muscogee (Creek) Nation once called home. Tribal ancestors lived there until they were forcibly removed in the 1800s as part of the federal government's policy of removal.

What they have left behind is an incredible history that dates back 12,000 years. "This is one of the largest collections of archaeological resources in the United States," Brink said.

The Five Civilized Tribes of Oklahoma, which includes the Creek, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw and Seminole tribes, are on the record opposing the freeway and 20 others have joined them. The Trust is calling on the Georgia Department of Transportation to consider a route that doesn't cut through the Old Fields.

Being named to the endangered list can save a site from certain death. Last year, Oklahoma City's Gold Dome Bank, which appeared on the 2001 list, was saved from demolition.

Awareness of the threats posed to an historic place can also bring change. Although the Valley of the Chiefs in Montana, home to ancient rock art and other sacred sites, didn't appear on any list, it was saved from an oil drilling project last year. Leasing rights were handed over to the National Trust after a coalition of Indian and non-Indian interests banded together to oppose development.

2003 Most Endangered List:
Zuni Salt Lake and Sanctuary Zone | Ocmulgee Old Fields | Full List

Relevant Links:
National Trust for Historic Preservation - http://www.nationaltrust.org

Related Stories:
Federal funds used for shooting range near sacred site (03/25)
Tribal school project on 'endangered' parks list (01/15)
Sacred site bill increases tribal voice (7/19)
Interior has few answers at Senate hearing (7/18)
House clears sale of sacred site to church (6/18)
N.M. tribe challenges coal mine approval (6/3)
Input sought into sacred sites (6/5)
Congress considering sacred sites (5/21)
Tribes push action on sacred sites (3/21)
Tribe prevails on sacred site case (3/19)
Norton denies politics played role in drilling (6/7)
Norton hit on exploration of sacred site (6/6)
Myers reversing sacred site opinion (10/25)

Copyright © Indianz.Com

Stay Connected

On Facebook

On Twitter

On Google+

On SoundCloud

More Headlines

Obama seeks another increase for Indian Health Service budget (2/10)
Lakota Country Times: Indian lawmakers oppose drug testing bill (2/10)
Vince Two Eagles: The rez of the story about treaty-making in US (2/10)
Kristi Noem: Indian Health Service remains in state of emergency (2/10)
Chase Iron Eyes: Real sovereigns don't disenroll their own people (2/10)
Albert Bender: Tribes should reclaim land from unratified treaties (2/10)
John Lavelle: Supreme Court weighs key tribal sovereignty issue (2/10)
Women take top three leadership positions at Menominee Nation (2/10)
Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders win big in New Hampshire vote (2/10)
Prairie Island Indian Community unveils $19M gaming expansion (2/10)
Seminole Tribe's gaming compact takes a step forward in Florida (2/10)
Schaghticoke Tribal Nation insists on pursuing Connecticut casino (2/10)
National campaign launched to stop tribal disenrollment epidemic (2/9)
President Obama seeks $2.9B budget for Bureau of Indian Affairs (2/9)
Office of Special Trustee budget request remains steady at $140M (2/9)
Bureau of Reclamation emphasizes tribal water rights settlements (2/9)
Lakota Country Times: Indian health at center of Medicaid debate (2/9)
Mark Trahant: Native candidates fall behind in the big money wars (2/9)
Vi Waln: Arrogance keeps Keystone XL plans alive in South Dakota (2/9)
Charles Kader: Haudenosaunee territory will always be Indian land (2/9)
Mike Myers: Indigenous teachings still guide our ways of life today (2/9)
Albuquerque Indian Center faces closure without additional money (2/9)
Leader of Bois Forte Band promises fight against substance abuse (2/9)
Coushatta Tribe wins ruling in long-running dispute with contractor (2/9)
Pamunkey Tribe looks to a stronger future with federal recognition (2/9)
Isle de Jean Charles Band to relocate with help of $48M HUD grant (2/9)
Nambe Pueblo hopes small casino stands out in a crowded market (2/9)
St. Regis Mohawk Tribe sends fewer gaming funds to communities (2/9)
Tribes in Connecticut still working on process for potential casino (2/9)
Girls basketball team proudly wears Navajo hairstyle during game (2/8)
National Indian Gaming Commission slated to get a third member (2/8)
Senate committee to host roundtable on Tribal Law and Order Act (2/8)
Senate Indian Affairs Committee postpones field hearing into EPA (2/8)
Senate designates National Tribal Colleges and Universities Week (2/8)
Bill John Baker: Cherokee Nation invests in our people's wellbeing (2/8)
Kevin Washburn: Republicans punish tribe in public lands measure (2/8)
Harold Monteau: Democrats stack the deck for only one candidate (2/8)
Cutcha Risling Baldy: Don't let Leonard Peltier die in prison system (2/8)
Robert Jumper: Keep Eastern Cherokee council meetings on record (2/8)
Brian Pierson: Menominee Nation loses decision at Supreme Court (2/8)
Probe continues into unsolved homicide of 11-year-old Native girl (2/8)
Burns Paiute Tribe might seek to reopen judgment for stolen lands (2/8)
Shinnecock Nation approves plans to join medical marijuana field (2/8)
Teams protest corporate sponsor of Native basketball tournament (2/8)
Rosebud Sioux Tribe faces obstacles with repatriation of students (2/8)
Wallace Coffey resigns as chair of Comanche Nation after 25 years (2/8)
more headlines...

Advertisement

Home | Arts & Entertainment | Business | Canada | Cobell Lawsuit | Education | Environment | Federal Recognition | Federal Register | Forum | Health | Humor | Indian Gaming | Indian Trust | Jack Abramoff Scandal | Jobs & Notices | Law | National | News | Opinion | Politics | Sports | Technology | World

Indianz.Com Terms of Service | Indianz.Com Privacy Policy
About Indianz.Com | Advertise on Indianz.Com

Indianz.Com is a product of Noble Savage Media, LLC and Ho-Chunk, Inc.