FROM THE ARCHIVE
Diabetes funding killed
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JULY 14, 2000

Had Congress heard President Clinton's call for more health funding for minorities, the Senate might not have killed a measure that would have given more money to diabetes programs for Native Americans in the year 2001.

By a 27-73 vote on Wednesday, July 12, the Senate rejected an amendment introduced by Senator James Inhofe (R-Okla) that would have shifted $7.4 million from the National Endowment for the Arts to the Indian Health Service for diabetes treatment, prevention, and research.

"Among American Indians, 12.2 percent of those over age 19 have diabetes," said Inhofe. "It is very clear to see our money is better spent there."

Senator Slade Gorton (R-Wash) opposed the amendment, mainly because it would have taken away from the NEA budget, which is only $105 million for next year. He cited $56 million already appropriated for improved IHS clinical services and $30 million to accelerate diabetes efforts from the Balanced Budget Act of 1997.

Twenty-four percent of Native Americans in Oklahoma suffer from diabetic retinopathy which can lead to serious eye problems, including blindness.

Related Stories:
Clinton announces diabetes funding (The Medicine Wheel 7/14)
Scientists decode human genome (Tech 06/27)
Heart disease doubles (The Medicine Wheel 06/26)
Tribe holds first health fair (The Medicine Wheel 06/09)
State to help tribes (The Medicine Wheel 06/22)

Only on Indianz.Com:
Diabetes Links and Resources (The Medicine Wheel 4/10)

Relevant Links:
Senator James Inhofe - www.senate.gov/~inhofe
Senator Slade Gorton - http://www.senate.gov/~gorton
The Indian Health Service - www.ihs.gov

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