The Cupeño people survived near genocide and forced removal. They may not be able to overcome disenrollment and the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
The late attorney Arthur Lazarus, Jr., handled the Sioux Nation's landmark claim to the Black Hills.
If we are to break the chains of 'federal trust' and colonial 'paternalism' we must know our opponents and have a strong command of our collective histories.
The Prairie Island Indian Community continues efforts to provide a safe and stable homeland for its people.
Arthur Lazarus Jr., an Indian law practitioner who represented the Sioux Nation in its Black Hills land claim, died on July 27, 2019.
As the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates hit the stage for their second round of debates, some of the hopefuls are sitting down with tribal leaders.


The 2020 Democratic presidential field is a crowded one. Some candidates are distinguishing themselves in Indian Country.

A bill to help tribes address the impacts of climate change is up for its first hearing in the 116th Congress.

The Indian Health Service has a trust and treaty responsibility to provide proper health care to tribal members and it continues to fail in its duty.

As Donald Trump agrees reluctantly to respect the Supreme Court, he follows a long-ago legal victory of the Cherokee Nation.

A bill to repeal a termination-era law that affects citizens of the Spirit Lake Nation is being advanced by the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

The $725 million backlog in maintenance at Indian schools is just the tip of the iceberg.

The drama that has been Washington gets a two-year break after the president and leaders in Congress reach a budget deal.

Leaders of the Ute Tribe and the Yankton Sioux Tribe are calling on fellow Indian nations to oppose an eagle feather petition they say weakens treaty rights and undermines sovereignty.

The newly named Oyate Health Center will be serving the Oyate, or the people, in South Dakota.

John Paul Stevens often supported the rights of tribes during his time on the nation's highest court.

Tribes are supporting legislation to ban energy development on ancestral lands in Arizona and in New Mexico.

The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States is taking testimony on tribal land claims, tribal self-governance, Indian education and Indian policy.

A petition that could lead to major changes in the way eagle feathers are eagle parts are handled by the federal government has generated significant controversy.

It's still anyone's guess why the nation's highest court postponed a decision in one of the most consequential Indian law cases in recent history.

Midway through the third year of the Trump presidency, someone is finally dedicated to tribal issues at the White House.

The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States is gearing up for more activity following the recent holiday recess.

Federal recognition, tribal homelands and compensation for Native Americans exposed to uranium await further action in the nation's capital.

The nation's highest court threw Indian Country for a loop on the final day of a blockbuster term for tribal rights.

Tribal leaders are seeking support for bills that would guarantee water to their people in Arizona, Utah and New Mexico.

The nation's highest court made Indian Country wait a really, really long time for a decision in one of most consequential cases in recent history.

Water rights for the Navajo Nation, the Hualapai Tribe and Pueblo tribes are being taken up on Capitol Hill.

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe is battling the Trump administration in a lawsuit that will stay in the nation's capital.

Democrats are holding their first presidential debates but the candidates most familiar with Indian issues are not participating.

Is the nation's highest court on Indian time? It sure looks like it, judging by the wait for a decision in a highly-anticipated case.

Observances and ceremonies for sacred places will be held across the land on the Summer Solstice.

A bill to improve aging roads and bridges in Indian Country and another to correct a failing of the disastrous tribal termination era are advancing on Capitol Hill.

The Trump administration came under fire for showing up unprepared to a hearing of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs despite being notified a month ago.

Democrats are hoping to avoid another shutdown of the federal government, like the one that crippled tribal and urban Indian communities earlier in the year.

Bills to address aging roads and bridges in Indian Country and to correct a failing of the tribal termination era are moving forward on Capitol Hill.

Veterans of the 1969 occupation of Alcatraz Island will return to the site of the historic takeover.