cherokeenation The state of Oklahoma is working with tribal nations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Indian Health Service to ensure the COVID-19 vaccine reaches as many people as possible.
missshoshonebannockihs The Indian Health Service has distributed nearly 1.22 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine to tribes and their communities, outpacing many states with its outreach.

virginiahedrick The coronavirus pandemic has led to rising rates of domestic violence, substance abuse, mental health problems and food insecurity among Native people in California.
kiowa1 The Kiowa Tribe ramped up emergency assistance efforts for citizens as severe weather conditions are now only beginning to abate in Oklahoma.
nativeamericacalling nac Four films made by Indigenous filmmakers from around the globe premiered at this year’s Sundance Festival.


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Rep. Deb Haaland (D-New Mexico) discusses economic development in Indian Country and self-governance for tribal nations in a video message to the Native American Contractors Association.

Deb Haaland
Rep. Deb Haaland (D-New Mexico) is inching closer to making history as the first Native person to serve in a modern-day presidential cabinet.

nativeamericacalling nac
The Department of Health and Human Services Office of Civil Rights issued guidance to Indian Health Service facilities for serving the needs of individuals with disabilities.

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The Indian Health Service announced a hotline to accept reports of suspected child or sexual abuse following controversy involving a pediatrician who was convicted of crimes against young patients.

nafoa
NAFOA is here to build and support our community. Join us!

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Amid concerns about COVID-19 and public safety, leaders of the Navajo Nation are establishing a permanent home in Washington, D.C., to advocate for their tribe’s needs.

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The observance of “We Heart Our Cherokee Health Heroes” is both a symbolic and tangible appreciation reflecting our deepest respect and enduring support.

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The American Heart Association says it’s too soon to tell for sure, but widespread COVID-19 infections might cause a surge in cardiovascular disease and death in the coming months and years.

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From virtual consultations to mobile testing, COVID-19 has changed the way organizations provide HIV/AIDS services.

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Indian Country will be seeing major change on Capitol Hill as the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs meets for the first time.

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The Indian Health Service alone reports nearly 180,000 positive coronavirus tests and that’s likely a fraction of the total number of Native COVID-19 cases.

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The COVID-19 global pandemic has been hard on us all, but Cherokee Nation did not sit back while the pandemic threatened our health and our economy.

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Please join a virtual memorial in memory of Albert Hale, a former president of the Navajo Nation who died due to complications from COVID-19.

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Sen. Ben Ray Luján (D-New Mexico), a new member of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, is pushing for increased COVID-19 relief and federal funding for tribal nations.

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“In Nevada and across the country, our tribes are hurting,” said Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nevada) in calling for additional COVID-19 relief and resources for Indian Country.

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Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) delivers his first speech as the new chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

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Tribal nations were concerned about “bad men” when they negotiated treaties. Will the U.S. Supreme Court uphold those promises?

nativeamericacalling nac
There are a number of healthy alternatives, including traditional Native methods, for managing stress.

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It’s been a year into the pandemic and Native people are still being disproportionately impacted by COVID-19.

marshallmckay
Shake off the Zoom fatigue and tune in to important updates!

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A Donald Trump supporter charged in connection with the violence at the U.S. Capitol has hindered his case by refusing a COVID-19 test and avoiding his court-appointed, taxpayer-funded attorney.

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Tribal communities are worried about the toll COVID-19 is taking on elders and what that means for tribal language and culture.

nativeamericacalling nac
What does a halt on the Keystone KXL Pipeline mean for the environment and the future of extractive industry in and around Native land?

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Native American organizations raised and donated $32 million during the first seven months of the pandemic according to a new report from Native Americans in Philanthropy.

With one of the debacles of the Donald Trump era still raging in the courts, Indian Country will be paying close attention as the Department of the Treasury gains new leadership.

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Get more involved in our NAFOA community!

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From re-examining the boundaries of the Bears Ears National Monument to helping tribal nations restore their homelands, the Joe Biden administration will hit the ground running.

nafoa
It’s a short week with a lot of important news for Indian Country.

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Michael Weahkee will be stepping down as director of the Indian Health Service on January 20.

nativeamericacalling nac
Native students are falling further and further behind due to COVID-19. How can we get them back on track?

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Nearly a year into the COVID-19 pandemic, Rep. Markwayne Mullin (R-Oklahoma) is still downplaying the protocols that slow the spread of the coronavirus.

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NAFOA is hitting the ground running in 2021 to keep tribes informed and supported.

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When the coronavirus hit a community bordering the Tohono O’odham Nation, the shelves of its one grocery story were cleaned out.

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Hoop dancing competitions, stand-up comedy and an annual gathering of Native elders and youth are all events the pandemic forced online.

nativeamericacalling nac
Time Magazine dubbed 2020 as “The Worst Year Ever.” But if you’re one to look at the glass half full, this year was also filled with a lot of small, positive things.