tag: ancs

Shauna Hegna
By working together, we can catch enough fish to feed all of our families.
Alyssa London
Alyssa London, a citizen of the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes, is set to become a familiar face on NBC News and MSNBC.
Legislative Hearing on H.R. 437, H.R. 6063, H.R. 6181 [Discussion Draft ANS], S. 314, S. 559, and S. 789
The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States holds a legislative hearing on six tribal bills on April 27, 2022.
Legislative Hearing on H.R. 437, H.R. 6063, H.R. 6181 [Discussion Draft ANS], S. 314, S. 559, and S. 789
The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States holds a legislative hearing on six tribal bills on April 27, 2022.
Raúl Grijalva
A Democratic-led bill to strengthen the policy of tribal consultation has hit a snag on Capitol Hill, leaving some supporters wondering about its future.
U.S. Capitol
Voters in Alaska are facing quite the U.S. Congressional race, with four Native candidates among dozens seeking to represent their state in the nation’s capital.
Tundra to Table Cookbook
Native America Calling: The Menu (February 25, 2022)
From a sugarbush ceremony shut down by police to the new “Tundra to Table” cookbook, come see what’s On The Menu with Native America Calling.
National Indian Impacted Schools Association
A bipartisan bill that will help school districts with Indian Country students preserve their Impact Aid funding is set to clear the 117th Congress.
Chuck Sams
In a sit-down conversation with Underscore.news, Chuck Sams, the country’s first Native American parks director, discusses the role his agency can play in better representing Indigenous people and their stories.
Senate Committee on Indian Affairs
The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs holds a roundtable discussion on January 12, 2022.
Deb Haaland
The Department of the Interior will be consulting tribal nations, Alaska Native corporations and Native Hawaiian organizations as it moves forward with the Indian Youth Service Corps Program.
Brian Schatz
The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will learn how Native communities are leveraging federal financing to advance economic sovereignty.
U.S. Supreme Court
The nation’s highest court is running into snags that have plagued other institutions grappling with the ongoing health crisis.
nativeamericacalling nac
Land stewardship is at the core of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, also known as ANCSA.
Alaska Native Youth
Alaska Native corporations are figuring out how to distribute the funds more than a year after the CARES Act lawsuit started.
nativeamericacalling nac
This year marks the 50th Anniversary of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, also known as ANCSA.
nativeamericacalling nac
Join Native America Calling for its monthly recap of the top news in Indian Country, including the announcement of the Indian boarding school investigation.
Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation
Alaska Native corporations will finally be able to receive COVID-19 funds after the nation’s highest court ruled in their favor in one of the most heated Indian law and policy disputes in decades.
U.S. Supreme Court
The U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision in Yellen v. Confederated Tribes of Chehalis Reservation on June 25, 2021.
crowtribe
The nation’s highest court has unanimously sided with tribal sovereignty in one of two Indian law cases on the docket.
hunatotemcorporation
The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs is taking another look at the ways in which COVID-19 has impacted Native communities.
nativeamericacalling nac
The fate of hundreds of millions of dollars in federal coronavirus relief money is now in the hands of the nation’s highest court. Learn more on the monthly Native news recap!
yellenvchehalis
The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in Yellen v. Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, a dispute over COVID-19 funding in Indian Country.
supremecourt
The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in Yellen v. Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, No. 20-543, on April 19, 2021.
jonathannez
Infighting among tribal attorneys led the nation’s highest court down an unusual path on the eve of arguments in a closely-watched COVID-19 case.
U.S. Supreme Court
Are Alaska Native corporations the same as Indian tribes? The nation’s highest court is poised to answer the question.
crowtribe
The nation’s highest court has taken up its first Indian law case of the term, with ensuring public safety on reservations at the forefront.
nafoa
NAFOA stays on top of the news so you always start your week informed and ready.
gatheringmedicinebrentgreenwood
NAFOA looks out for our community — help us grow by forwarding this newsletter!
debhaaland
The Native American Contractors Association will hear from Secretary of the Interior nominee Deb Haaland and other key members of Congress this week.
crowagency
Tribal nations were concerned about “bad men” when they negotiated treaties. Will the U.S. Supreme Court uphold those promises?
With one of the debacles of the Donald Trump era still raging in the courts, Indian Country will be paying close attention as the Department of the Treasury gains new leadership.
nano
NAFOA is hitting the ground running in 2021 to keep tribes informed and supported.
debhaaland
In a historic first, Deb Haaland, one of the first two Native women to serve in the U.S. Congress, has been tapped to serve in the incoming Joe Biden administration.
mikedunleavy
The state of Alaska is siding with Native corporations over tribal governments in a closely-watched COVID-19 case pending before the U.S. Supreme Court.
donaldtrumpamyconeybarrett
With the nation’s highest court stacked with even more conservative justices, tribes are once again paying close attention to a COVID-19 funding dispute they thought was over.
asrcanchorage
Alaska Native corporations top a list of Alaska-owned businesses ranked by gross revenues.
jonathannez
It’s been over six months since Congress set aside $8 billion in COVID-19 relief for Indian Country. The battle over the funds is still not over.
In the most recent about-face on CARES Act funding for Alaska Native corporations, a federal appeals court panel ruled that they are not eligible for any of the $8 billion in pandemic relief.
Alaska Native corporations are not entitled to shares of the $8 billion coronavirus relief fund, a federal appeals court ruled in a closely-watched case.