tag: doj

jakeangeliqanonshaman
One of the most recognizable defendants from the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is a Donald Trump supporter who bases his persona on a warped interpretation of Native traditions.
jorgeriley
A self-described right-wing Native Republican boasted of taking part in the violent attack on the U.S. Capitol.
muscogeecreeknation
With change coming at the highest levels of government, tribal and federal officials are working to ensure the crisis of missing and murdered loved ones in Indian Country remains a priority.
supremecourt
For the second time in as many years, the U.S. Supreme Court will be taking up a case that impacts the treaty rights of the Crow Tribe.
donaldtrumpamyconeybarrett
With the nation’s highest court stacked with even more conservative justices, tribes are once again paying close attention to a COVID-19 funding dispute they thought was over.
donaldtrump
Operation Lady Justice, the Trump administration’s initiative to address missing and murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives, is accepting comments through October 31, 2020.
nomorestolensistersmmiw
It took years of work by Native women and activists but legislation to address the crisis of missing and murdered sisters and relatives has finally become law.
whitehouse
President Donald Trump signed two bills to address the crisis of missing and murdered Native people, especially women and girls, into law on October 10, 2020.
debhaaland
Could Deb Haaland lead the Department of the Interior in a Joe Biden administration?
jonathannez
It’s been over six months since Congress set aside $8 billion in COVID-19 relief for Indian Country. The battle over the funds is still not over.
debhaalandnancypelosnormatorres
Countless hours of tribal official and grassroots advocacy for missing and murdered Indigenous women and their families paid off when Congress gave final approval to Savanna’s Act and the Not Invisible Act.
williambarrdonaldtrump
The Trump administration tried to undermine tribal treaty rights at the nation’s highest court. Federal prosecutors are now paying the price.
mmiw
Native American advocates and victim’s families have worked for years to draw attention to Indian Country’s epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women.