COVID-19 in Indian Country
COVID Success Stories Community of Learning is an effort to respond to emerging issues Urban Indian Organizations (UIO) continue to encounter during the COVID-19 pandemic.
National Council of Urban Indian Health​

The National Council of Urban Indian Health presented testimony on behalf of urban Indian organizations at two hearings on Capitol Hill.
National Council of Urban Indian Health​

The fiscal year 2023 budget proposal includes $9.1 billion in mandatory funding for the Indian Health Service for the first year.
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The bill includes $73.4 million for urban Indian health and $6.6 billion for the Indian Health Service.
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“Adequate funding for Indian Country is crucial now more than ever, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic has, and continues to be, the deadliest for American Indian and Alaska Native communities,” said Francys Crevier of the National Council of Urban Indian Health.
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“After decades of being ignored and forgotten, we applaud the Senate Appropriations Committee for the robust legislation proposed to improve outcomes for Indian Country,” said NCUIH CEO Francys Crevier.
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The National Council of Urban Indian Health is paying close attention to implementation of the American Rescue Plan Act affecting urban Indian organizations.
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Urban Indian health providers will finally be able to use existing funds to expand, renovate and upgrade their facilities under the bipartisan infrastructure bill.
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“This technical fix will be critical to expanding health care infrastructure for Native communities who have been devastated by the COVID-19 pandemic,” said CEO Francys Crevier of the National Council of Urban Indian Health.
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“The impacts of COVID-19 will be with our Native communities for a long time to come,” said Sonya Tetnowski, president-elect of the National Council of Urban Indian Health.
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“Since last fall, NCUIH and Native American LifeLines have pushed for the inclusion of the 65,000 Natives in the DMV as Natives are dying from COVID-19 at the highest rates worldwide,” said NCUIH CEO Francys Crevier.
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The National Council of Urban Indian Health and Native American LifeLines are pleased to announce COVID-19 vaccinations for urban Indians in the D.C., Maryland, and Virginia metropolitan area.
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The American Rescue Plan Act includes $84 million for urban Indian health providers and addresses critical Medicaid coverage.
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Urban Indian frontline health workers will now have the same coverage as their other health system counterparts.
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The National Indian Health Board honored and awarded the National Council of Urban Indian Health with an Outstanding Service Award for National Impact.

Please join a livestream where experts address resources and tactics for suicide prevention for American Indians and Alaska Natives in honor of #HopeForLife.

Robyn Sunday-Allen, National Council of Urban Indian Health Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of the Oklahoma City Indian Clinic, will testify before the House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States.

On Friday, July 17, National Council of Urban Indian Health Executive Director Francys Crevier will testify before of the United States Commission on Civil Rights regarding COVID-19 and its impact on American Indians/Alaska Natives.

Given broad support across the aisles, in both chambers, and by Indian Country, the National Council of Urban Indian Health will continue to advocate for swift passage of S.3650, the Coverage for Urban Indian Health Providers Act, in the next COVID-19 package.

On June 11, 2020, Executive Director Francys Crevier of the National Council of Urban Indian Health will testify before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies.