A coronavirus relief bill includes an $8 billion fund for tribal governments but it almost got cut out of the final package.
The coronavirus is hitting American Indians and Alaska Natives hard.
With number of positive COVID-19 cases rising in tribal communities, Indian Country will finally see billions of dollars from a coronavirus package almost over the finish line on Capitol Hill.
Coronavirus is impacting everyone and changing our everyday lives.
Unlike the traditional enemies our nation has faced throughout history, COVID-19 is one that can dangerously hide in plain sight and threaten the health and wellbeing of any American community.
With additional federal funds on the table, tribes continue to press the Trump administration to ensure their communities aren't left out of relief efforts as the coronavirus spreads among their people.


It is morally wrong to continue to neglect the indigenous people of America who paid for their healthcare with the ceding of millions of acres of their land.

As coronavirus cases across America continue to surge, tribal leaders are taking dramatic steps to ensure the safety of their people and those they serve.

Officials want Yellowstone National Park closed in response to concern that tourists may contribute to an outbreak of COVID-19 in the neighboring counties in Montana.

The coronavirus continues to wreak social and economic havoc in Indian County, with tribes curtailing their operations as the first cases are confirmed in their communities.

Thousands of wild horses and burros roam across millions of acres of public land in 10 Western states

Tribal nations held off the Keystone XL Pipeline in federal court even as the company behind the controversial project moved forward with man camps.

Republicans tried to derail a sacred sites hearing by using the coronavirus as an excuse. It didn't work.

Environmental and indigenous activists returned to federal court in Montana, seeking to stop construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline.

The largest city in North Dakota has shut down a community-run sweat lodge due to concerns about health and safety.

The U.S. Forest Service approved a $60 million expansion of a privately-owned ski resort in the sacred San Francisco Peaks.

On September 19, Taos Pueblo will commemorate the fifty-year anniversary of the return of sacred Blue Lake to the tribe.

'Right now, throughout the world, we’re not taking care of our lands,' Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said.

Tribal energy development and tribal wildlife management are on the agenda for the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

The world is beginning to better understand that the core of extractive industries are tied to deep political and economic conflicts related to the settler-colonial present and a shared colonial history.

Two Arizonans -- one of them a tribal leader -- from two points on the border brought two very different ideas about the border wall to a hearing in the nation's capital.

The subjects of the 'Warrior Women' film are speaking out against the dangers of the Keystone XL Pipeline.

The Lakota Food Summit drew hundreds of us to talk about how to eat, how to cook, how to pay attention to the environment and how to engage in plantings and harvesting of foods that sustained our ancestors for centuries.

Building sustainable communities is the antidote to fear of a changing climate.

An emotional Tohono O’odham Nation chairman said blasting sacred sites to build a border wall has 'forever damaged our people.'

Indigenous leaders were among the many who raised their voices at one of only two hearings on a Trump administration proposal to roll back environmental policy.

Efforts to memorialize the 550-mile path that the Ponca people were forced to walk in the late 1800s are getting a major boost.

The House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States will be discussing the Trump administration's destruction of sacred sites at a hearing in Washington, D.C.

A federal judge has overturned environmental permits for the Rosemont Copper Mine, a controversial project opposed by tribes in Arizona.

States with fewer local protections and resources will suffer the most — as will their people and wildlife.

The Ojibwe people are revitalizing the 'berry fast,' a coming-of-age ritual for girls.

The Oglala Sioux Tribe doesn't accept donations from oil companies but that didn't stop one district from cashing a $50,000 Keystone XL Pipeline check.

The Cherokee Nation is the first tribe in the U.S. to receive an invitation to deposit its traditional seeds in the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Norway.

The Trump administration took another step toward expediting a border wall, waiving federal contracting regulations to fast track construction in four states.

A proposal to convey the National Bison Range to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes has generated a mixture of excitement, concern, and outright opposition

Tribal officials raised issues ranging from polluted water to underfunded police but there was one message they all had for lawmakers – the government needs to be a more reliable partner on critical projects.