Over the last few weeks we have seen numerous efforts brought forth to protect Montanans during these trying times.
A coronavirus relief bill includes an $8 billion fund for tribal governments but it almost got cut out of the final package.
The coronavirus is hitting American Indians and Alaska Natives hard.
With number of positive COVID-19 cases rising in tribal communities, Indian Country will finally see billions of dollars from a coronavirus package almost over the finish line on Capitol Hill.
Coronavirus is impacting everyone and changing our everyday lives.
Unlike the traditional enemies our nation has faced throughout history, COVID-19 is one that can dangerously hide in plain sight and threaten the health and wellbeing of any American community.


With additional federal funds on the table, tribes continue to press the Trump administration to ensure their communities aren't left out of relief efforts as the coronavirus spreads among their people.

It is morally wrong to continue to neglect the indigenous people of America who paid for their healthcare with the ceding of millions of acres of their land.

The Senate deadlocked for a second day on more than $1 trillion in proposed support for an economy buffeted by coronavirus, as Democrats said the bill gives too much to corporations and Republicans accuse Democrats of making it a liberal wish list.

As coronavirus cases across America continue to surge, tribal leaders are taking dramatic steps to ensure the safety of their people and those they serve.

The Trump administration finally announced plans to distribute much-needed funding to Indian Country as the number of coronavirus cases continues to grow in communities that have long been underserved by the federal government.

Officials want Yellowstone National Park closed in response to concern that tourists may contribute to an outbreak of COVID-19 in the neighboring counties in Montana.

With many people staying inside to slow the spread of the coronavirus, a Lakota man went from house to house, delivering much-needed supplies to people in need.

Our courageous team at Cherokee Nation is doing everything possible to maintain essential services and meet the needs of the people, as our health and emergency staff prepare for the worst.

With the number of coronavirus cases in Indian Country growing by the day, tribes are pressing the federal government to live up to its treaty and trust responsibilities and ensure their communities aren't left out of relief efforts.

When I was growing up on Akwesasne Mohawk Territory there were social habits which reflected an historical response to the devastating communicable diseases which came close to wiping out our ancestors.

The rapid spread of novel coronavirus has prompted government, business, and civil society to take dramatic action.

The Senate gave overwhelming approval to a multibillion-dollar coronavirus relief bill, the second such bill in two weeks, and immediately turned its attention to a third bill that could have a $1 trillion price tag.

The number of COVID-19 cases in our country is growing by the day and without taking any steps to address it, the number of people who become infected will exponentially grow.

With confirmed cases of COVID-19 multiplying rapidly across the nation and around the world, there is increasing concern about how to effectively slow the spread of the coronavirus in the United States.

The coronavirus continues to wreak social and economic havoc in Indian County, with tribes curtailing their operations as the first cases are confirmed in their communities.

Despite some strides in improving health care access and treatment in Indian Country, cultural barriers still prevent patients from asking for help or getting treatment.

Voters of the Oglala Sioux Tribe want to legalize marijuana, but not alcohol, on the Pine Ridge Reservation, according to the unofficial results.

President Julian Bear Runner took action following news of coronavirus cases in South Dakota and learning of a lack of test kits at the Indian Health Service.

A bipartisan bill to improve health care for urban Indian veterans is taking another step forward on Capitol Hill.

The United South and Eastern Tribes said more than half of its members have imposed coronavirus-related travel restrictions.

Concerns about the coronavirus are growing in tribal communities as advocates warn that $40 million isn't nearly enough to prevent the spread of the disease among urban and reservation Indians.

The largest city in North Dakota has shut down a community-run sweat lodge due to concerns about health and safety.

Tribes, organizations and enterprises in Indian Country are trying to conduct business and mitigate fears about the coronavirus.

The Indian Health Service remains without a permanent leader as the coronavirus emerges as the latest crisis for the agency.

If you take out the words 'tribal' and 'Indian' all you have left are a group of patients fighting a federal government agency for the right to health care.

Olympic gold medalist Billy Mills announced the sixth class of American Indian youth to receive $10,000 Dreamstarter grants for projects that help them bring their dreams to life.

'Tribes are not prepared for the coronavirus,' one health expert told Indian Country Today.

The Lakota Food Summit drew hundreds of us to talk about how to eat, how to cook, how to pay attention to the environment and how to engage in plantings and harvesting of foods that sustained our ancestors for centuries.

The Cherokee Nation is the first tribe in the U.S. to receive an invitation to deposit its traditional seeds in the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Norway.

The Omaha Tribe of declared a state of emergency following weeks of tragedy in the community.