Some tribes will lose out on millions of dollars in additional COVID-19 relief because the Trump administration is cutting them off.
Thank goodness, spring has sprung and here in Montana and Wyoming, people are gradually getting sprung from the confines of quarantine and self-imposed social distancing and isolation.
The Trump administration's efforts to address the crisis of the missing and murdered in Indian Country are being undermined by the president himself, Native women asserted as outrage over police violence continues to sweep the nation.
From missed deadlines to a massive data breach, the Trump administration's handling of an $8 billion coronavirus relief fund promised to tribes has been one big mess.
It was a federal judge's mistake but it forced the Trump administration into disclosing the troubles tribes are facing as they seek the COVID-19 funds they were promised two months ago.
The Trump administration's missing and murdered task force got off to a rocky start in the age of COVID-19, leaving a number of Native women silenced amid technical and logistical challenges.


Tribal communities that have closed their borders to protect themselves from COVID-19 are facing a new threat: being undercounted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

I am so happy to get on the 'cloud' and hear the wonderful sound of the Cheyenne language.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, some Native Americans have found a way to safely host traditional powwows by moving them online.

A federal judge trashed the Trump administration for changing course on Indian Country homelands policy during the worst public health crisis in decades.

Tribal nations are still jumping through bureaucratic hoops in order to secure the full $8 billion in COVID-19 relief that was promised more than seven weeks ago.

The federal government has so far distributed about $3.4 billion in long-awaited coronavirus relief funds to tribal nations, more than a month after delays placed the Trump administration at the center of yet another COVID-19 controversy.

One of the greatest sources of strength Cherokee people have right now is our culture and heritage.

With just a month left before voters go to the polls, Karen Bedonie is looking for ways to boost her struggling Congressional campaign during the worst public health crisis in decades.

With the coronavirus continuing to exact a heavy toll on the first Americans, a historic showdown is taking place in federal court as Indian Country fights over the future of an $8 billion COVID-19 relief fund promised to tribal governments.

With just days left before an $8 billion coronavirus relief fund is supposed to go out to Indian Country, the Trump administration has yet to decide how to distribute the much-needed money.

The $8 billion tribal relief fund could be gone soon. Based on the leaking of sensitive information, it’s clear the pool will be far short of what’s needed.

An investigation by Indianz.Com shows the White House was one of the first recipients of sensitive information on nearly 700 tribes and Native entities.

Ruth Cedar Face was getting ready to make dinner when one of her children came into the house and said there was a fire. It was at the KILI radio station.

Being all of 6 years old, Zak Hoops just couldn’t understand why the college powwows he typically attends and where he performs the grass dance were being canceled.

As coronavirus cases across America continue to surge, tribal leaders are taking dramatic steps to ensure the safety of their people and those they serve.

Our laws and legal processes, as they relate to Facebook and its Big Tech brethren, are inadequate and unethical.

Building sustainable communities is the antidote to fear of a changing climate.

A new high school is opening on the Pine Ridge Reservation in the fall of 2020.

Recently, an elderly friend was victimized to the tune of $4,000 but avoided being taken for an additional $12,000.

When it comes to climate change, one expert says: 'Every single person can make a huge difference, and when we come together to work, anything is possible.'

Tribal representatives told a Senate committee that the Federal Communications Commission is not doing enough to ease the regulatory burdens that keep Indian Country from getting wireless broadband access.

The dismal state of broadband in tribal communities will be the focus of a pair of events in Washington, D.C.

The Mount Graham red squirrel is found only in the Pinaleño Mountains of Arizona, home of a sacred Apache place.

While lawmakers debate numerous issues of significance, an important matter surrounding personal freedom and national security quietly looms in the background.

The Democratic candidate for president wants to set aside $5 billion to help tribes expand broadband in their communities.

Native Hawaiians and other Indigenous peoples need more authority in the federal and state project processes that affect them.

I have always tried not to follow the flock, but it seems that nearly everyone I know is on Facebook so I decided to see what it was all about.

The 'Guide to Indigenous DC' takes users on a tour of sites that link to Native American prehistory all the way to modern history.

A historic indigenous resistance is unfolding on the Big Island of Hawaii, where thousands have descended on Mauna Kea, a sacred Native site.

Ballot tallies could be flown out of the Havasupai Reservation for the 2020 election.