The Table Mountain Rancheria recently celebrated the 30th anniversary of the Table Mountain Casino in Friant, California. Photo: Table Mountain Casino
NIGC | Regulation

National Indian Gaming Commission finalizes new rule for tribal fees

The National Indian Gaming Commission has finalized a new rule that should make it easier on tribes when paying fees, Chairman Jonodev Chaudhuri said.

The Part 514 rule, which was published in the Federal Register on Monday, requires the agency to announce and adopt annual fees, as well as fingerprint rates, at the same time and no later than November 1 each year. Previously, tribes had to deal with two different deadlines.

“We have developed this final rule through consultation with tribes and careful consideration of comments received," Chaudhuri said in a press release on Monday. "This rule simplifies the budgeting and fee calculation process, creating significant efficiencies for both the tribes and the agency."

The fees are important because tribes pay them in order to fund the NIGC. The agency does not otherwise depend on taxpayer dollars to regulate the $31.2 billion industry.

Fingerprint rates are also important. The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act requires tribes to submit background checks of key employees and officials and fingerprints, which are handled through the NIGC, are a part of that process.

Federal Register Notice:
Fees (January 22, 2018)