National | Federal Recognition

Klamath Tribes celebrate 30th anniversary of federal restoration






YouTube: Meet Me In Klamath for the 30th Annual Restoration Celebration and Pow-Wow

The Klamath Tribes of Oregon are celebrating the 30th anniversary of federal restoration.

Congress ended the federal government's relationship with the tribe in 1954 through the Klamath Temination Act. The Klamath, Modoc, and Yahooskin peoples lost their federal status and all of their lands as a result of the disastrous policy.

It took three more decades for Congress to correct the mistake. The Klamath Indian Tribe Restoration Act became law on August 27, 1986, setting the stage for the resurgence of the Klamath peoples.


Dancers at a Klamath Tribes Restoration Celebration. Photo by jmerriam7

"With restoration in 1986 the tribes began to develop a full scope of programs which provide necessary services to tribal members and the community," the tribe's website reads. "Today the tribes operate with a budget of over $12 million annually, with over 30 different departments and services offered."

To celebrate, the tribe is hosting its 30th annual Restoration Celebration from August 26-28. The event includes fun run/walk on August 26, a parade on August 27 and a powwow that runs August 28 through August 28.