Tribal recipients of the $8 billion coronavirus relief fund must submit an interim report to the Department of the Treasury Office of Inspector General no later than July 17, 2020.

Tribes must report “costs incurred” for the period covering March 1 through June 30. The document must contain totals in the following categories:

  • Amount transferred to other governments;
  • Amount spent on payroll for public health and safety employees;
  • Amount spent on budgeted personnel and services diverted to a substantially different use;
  • Amount spent to improve telework capabilities of public employees;
  • Amount spent on medical expenses;
  • Amount spent on public health expenses;
  • Amount spent to facilitate distance learning;
  • Amount spent providing economic support;
  • Amount spent on expenses associated with the issuance of tax anticipation notes; and
  • Amount spent on items not listed above.

Further information about the information that must be included in the interim report can be found in a July 2 memorandum titled Coronavirus Relief Fund Reporting and Record Retention Requirements.

Tribes aren’t the only governments facing the July 17 deadline. States and eligible local governments also must submit the interim report by email to Treasury’s Office of Inspector General.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, also known as the CARES Act, authorized a $150 billion coronavirus relief fund. Of this total, $8 billion was set aside for tribal governments.

The CARES Act required the tribal fund to be distributed “not later than 30 days” after enactment on March 27. The Department of the Treasury missed the deadline.

Treasury sent out initial payments on May 7. A second payment starting showing up in tribal bank accounts on June 15. A third and final payment was made several days later following a court order forcing the Trump administration to release the money.

Despite the delays, tribes are being required to submit the interim report, and to submit further reports, on the same schedule as states and other governments. Treasury did not delay payments to states or local governments.

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