COVID-19 in Indian Country
“As vice chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, I’m compelled to speak out to urge immediate, bipartisan action to provide more targeted relief for Native communities,” said Sen. Tom Udall (D-New Mexico).

Sen. Tom Udall (D-New Mexico) took part in a panel at the National Tribal Health Conference with tribal leaders and Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-New York).

“Tribal Nations prepaid for our healthcare," Walker River Paiute Tribe Chairwoman Amber Torres said. "Our Treaties require the federal government to fund our people’s care for the next seven generations and beyond."

'Tribes and Tribally-owned businesses from across Indian Country have been severely impacted by the economic strains brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic,' a bipartisan group of U.S. Senators told the Trump administration.

Sen. Tom Udall (D-New Mexico), vice chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, will press Trump administration witnesses on the Bureau of Indian Education response to the COVID-19 pandemic in tribal schools.

On Wednesday, July 29, 2020, at 2:30 PM EDT, immediately following a business meeting, the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will hold an oversight hearing titled “Preparing to Head Back to Class: Addressing How to Safely Reopen Bureau of Indian Education Schools.”

On Wednesday, July 29, 2020, at 2:30pm Eastern, the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will hold a business meeting to consider a dozen bills.

'Today, tribal communities are experiencing some of the highest rates of infection for COVID-19 in the country,' said Sen. John Hoeven (R-North Dakota), chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

U.S. Senator Martha McSally (R-Arizona) advocated for a reduced cost-sharing burden for Arizona’s tribes hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic.

The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will hold an oversight hearing on 'Evaluating the Response and Mitigation to the COVID-19 Pandemic in Native Communities' and a legislative hearing to receive testimony on S.3650, the Coverage for Urban Indian Health Providers Act.

Sen. John Hoeven (R-North Dakota), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, and Sen. Tom Udall (D-New Mexico), Vice Chairman, introduced S.4090, bipartisan legislation to reauthorize the Native American Housing Assistance and Self Determination Act (NAHASDA).

The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs meetings at 2:30pm Eastern on July 1, 2020, for an oversight hearing on COVID-19 and a legislative hearing on S. 3650, Coverage for the Urban Indian Health Providers Act.

According to the CDC, American Indians and Alaska Natives are at a disproportionate risk for complications from COVID-19 which are exacerbated by the lack of resources available for Tribal emergency preparedness programs.

Over two months after Congress passed the CARES Act, the Trump administration continues to withhold Indian Education COVID-19 funding to Tribal schools, leaving students without resources for distance learning.

The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs is holding its first hearing in the COVID-19 pandemic era.

Key lawmakers are calling for transparency from the Trump administration after tribes raised significant concerns about their shares of the $8 billion coronavirus relief fund.

According to the Federal Communications Commission, less than half of households on Tribal lands have access to fixed broadband service.

The Trump administration's botched handling of the $8 billion coronavirus relief fund is under investigation by internal watchdogs at both the Department of the Interior and the Department of the Treasury.

Tribes with homelands in North Dakota will receive approximately $109 million from the coronavirus relief fund, according to Sen. John Hoeven (R-North Dakota).

Nearly six weeks after the CARES Act was signed into law the Department of Treasury s beginning to distribute $4.8 billion of the $8 billion Congress allocated for Tribal Governments for a Coronavirus Relief Fund.