Federal Register


Posted: December 18, 2018
More: icwa, information collection, tribal courts

In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, we, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) are proposing to renew an information collection.


Abstract: The BIA is seeking to renew the information collection conducted under 25 CFR 13, Tribal Reassumption of Jurisdiction over Child Custody Proceedings, which prescribes procedures by which an Indian tribe that occupies a reservation over which a state asserts any jurisdiction pursuant to federal law may reassume jurisdiction over Indian child proceedings as authorized by the Indian Child Welfare Act, Public Law 95-608, 92 Stat. 3069, 25 U.S.C. 1918.


The collection of information will ensure that the provisions of Public Law 95-608 are met. Any Indian Tribe that became subject to State jurisdiction pursuant to the provisions of the Act of August 15, 1953 (67 Stat. 588), as amended by title IV of the Act of April 11, 1968 (82 Stat. 73,78), or pursuant to any other Federal law, may reassume jurisdiction over child custody proceedings. The collection of information provides data that will be used in considering the petition and feasibility of the plan of the Tribe for reassumption of jurisdiction over Indian child custody proceedings. We collect the following information: Full name, address, and telephone number of petitioning Tribe or Tribes; a Tribal resolution; estimated total number of members in the petitioning Tribe of Tribes with an explanation of how the number was estimated; current criteria for Tribal membership; citation to provision in Tribal constitution authorizing the Tribal governing body to exercise jurisdiction over Indian child custody matters; description of Tribal court; copy of any Tribal ordinances or Tribal court rules establishing procedures or rules for exercise of jurisdiction over child custody matters; and all other information required by 25 CFR 13.11.



Posted: December 17, 2018
More: energy, information collection

In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), the Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR), is proposing to renew an information collection with revisions. ONRR seeks renewed authority to collect information from lessees using five forms necessary to determine the correct royalties to be collected on behalf of Indian Tribes and individual Indian mineral owners. Revisions from the prior approval to collect this information are necessary because the information collection requirements on form ONRR-4410 were reduced by a rule in 2015.


Abstract: The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior is responsible for mineral resource development on Federal and Indian lands and the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Under various laws, the Secretary's responsibility is to manage mineral resources production on Federal and Indian lands and the OCS, collect the royalties and other mineral revenues due, and distribute the funds collected. The Secretary also has trust responsibility to manage Indian lands and seek advice and information from Indian beneficiaries. ONRR performs the minerals revenue management functions for the Secretary and assists the Secretary in carrying out the Department's trust responsibility for Indian lands. By collecting information from the records of the lessee or others involved in developing, transporting, processing, purchasing, or selling of such minerals, we ensure that lessees accurately value production and appropriately pay royalties. Public laws pertaining to mineral leases on Federal and Indian lands and the OCS are available at onrr.gov/​Laws_​R_​D/​PubLaws/​index.htm.


The information collections that we cover in this ICR involve five forms, forms ONRR-4109, ONRR-4110, ONRR-4295, ONRR-4410, and ONRR-4411. References to these forms, and form ONRR-4393, which is approved under OMB Control Number 1012-0005, are identified in: 30 CFR part 1202, subparts C and J, which pertain to Indian oil and gas royalties; part 1206, subparts B and E, which govern the valuation of oil and gas produced from leases on Indian lands; and part 1207, which pertains to recordkeeping. Indian Tribes and individual Indian mineral owners receive all royalties generated from their lands. Determining product valuation is essential to ensure that Indian Tribes and individual Indian mineral owners receive payment on the full value of the minerals removed from their lands. Failure to collect the data that we describe in this ICR could result in the undervaluation of leased minerals on Indian lands. All data reported is subject to subsequent audit and adjustment.



Posted: December 11, 2018
More: bia, california, dry creek, land-into-trust

The Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs has made a final determination to acquire 6.14 acres, more or less, into trust for the Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians, California on October 24, 2018.


This notice is published in the exercise of authority delegated by the Secretary of the Interior to the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs by part 209 of the Departmental Manual, and is published to comply with the requirement of 25 CFR 151.12(c)(2)(ii) that notice of the decision to acquire land in trust be promptly published in the Federal Register. On October 24, 2018, the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs issued a decision to accept land in trust for the Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians, California under the authority of Section 5 of the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 (48 Stat. 984).




Posted: December 4, 2018
More: hearth act, kansas, pbp, self-determination

On September 18, 2018, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) approved the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation Business Site Leasing Ordinance under the Helping Expedite and Advance Responsible Tribal Homeownership Act of 2012 (HEARTH Act). With this approval, the Tribe is authorized to enter into business and other authorized purposes leases without further BIA approval.


The HEARTH Act makes a voluntary, alternative land leasing process available to Tribes, by amending the Indian Long-Term Leasing Act of 1955, 25 U.S.C. 415. The HEARTH Act authorizes Tribes to negotiate and enter into agricultural and business leases of Tribal trust lands with a primary term of 25 years, and up to two renewal terms of 25 years each, without the approval of the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary).

The HEARTH Act also authorizes Tribes to enter into leases for residential, recreational, religious or educational purposes for a primary term of up to 75 years without the approval of the Secretary. Participating Tribes develop tribal leasing regulations, including an environmental review process, and then must obtain the Secretary's approval of those regulations prior to entering into leases. The HEARTH Act requires the Secretary to approve Tribal regulations if the Tribal regulations are consistent with the Department of the Interior's (Department) leasing regulations at 25 CFR part 162 and provide for an environmental review process that meets requirements set forth in the HEARTH Act. This notice announces that the Secretary, through the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs, has approved the Tribal regulations for the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation.


The Department's regulations governing the surface leasing of trust and restricted Indian lands specify that, subject to applicable Federal law, permanent improvements on leased land, leasehold or possessory interests, and activities under the lease are not subject to State and local taxation and may be subject to taxation by the Indian Tribe with jurisdiction. See 25 CFR 162.017. As explained further in the preamble to the final regulations, the Federal government has a strong interest in promoting economic development, self-determination, and Tribal sovereignty. 77 FR 72,440, 72,447-48 (December 5, 2012). The principles supporting the Federal preemption of State law in the field of Indian leasing and the taxation of lease-related interests and activities applies with equal force to leases entered into under Tribal leasing regulations approved by the Federal government pursuant to the HEARTH Act.


Section 5 of the Indian Reorganization Act, 25 U.S.C. 5108, preempts State and local taxation of permanent improvements on trust land. Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation v. Thurston County, 724 F.3d 1153, 1157 (9th Cir. 2013) (citing Mescalero Apache Tribe v. Jones, 411 U.S. 145 (1973)). Similarly, section 5108 preempts state taxation of rent payments by a lessee for leased trust lands, because “tax on the payment of rent is indistinguishable from an impermissible tax on the land.” See Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Stranburg, No. 14-14524, *13-*17, n.8 (11th Cir. 2015). In addition, as explained in the preamble to the revised leasing regulations at 25 CFR part 162, Federal courts have applied a balancing test to determine whether State and local taxation of non-Indians on the reservation is preempted. White Mountain Apache Tribe v. Bracker, 448 U.S. 136, 143 (1980). The Bracker balancing test, which is conducted against a backdrop of “traditional notions of Indian self-government,” requires a particularized examination of the relevant State, Federal, and Tribal interests. We hereby adopt the Bracker analysis from the preamble to the surface leasing regulations, 77 FR at 72,447-48, as supplemented by the analysis below.


The strong Federal and Tribal interests against State and local taxation of improvements, leaseholds, and activities on land leased under the Department's leasing regulations apply equally to improvements, leaseholds, and activities on land leased pursuant to Tribal leasing regulations approved under the HEARTH Act. Congress's overarching intent was to “allow Tribes to exercise greater control over their own land, support self-determination, and eliminate bureaucratic delays that stand in the way of homeownership and economic development in Tribal communities.” 158 Cong. Rec. H. 2682 (May 15, 2012). The HEARTH Act was intended to afford Tribes “flexibility to adapt lease terms to suit [their] business and cultural needs” and to “enable [Tribes] to approve leases quickly and efficiently.” Id. at 5-6.



Posted: December 4, 2018
More: class iii, compacts, gaming, igra, oklahoma, osage

The State of Oklahoma entered into an amendment with the Osage Nation governing certain forms of class III gaming; this notice announces the approval of the Osage Nation and State of Oklahoma Gaming Compact: Non-house-banked Table Games Supplement.


Under section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA), 25 U.S.C. 2701 et seq., the Secretary of the Interior shall publish in the Federal Register notice of approved Tribal-State compacts for the purpose of engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. As required by IGRA and 25 CFR 293.4, all compacts and amendments are subject to review and approval by the Secretary. The amendment authorizes the Tribe to engage in certain additional class III gaming activities, provides for the application of existing revenue sharing agreements to the additional forms of class III gaming, and designates how the State will distribute revenue sharing funds.



Posted: December 3, 2018
More: information collection, nagpra

In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, we, the National Park Service (NPS) are proposing to renew an information collection.

bstract: The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990 (25 U.S.C. 3001-3013) requires all public and private museums receiving Federal funds (other than the Smithsonian Institution) to compile summaries, inventories, and notices regarding Native American cultural items in their possession or control. This information must be provided to lineal descendants, likely interested Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and the NPS National NAGPRA Program. Under NAGPRA and its implementing regulations, we are mandated to collect any information that is pertinent in determining the cultural affiliation and geographical origin of Native American human remains and cultural items. This include descriptions, acquisition data, and records of consultation. Once the identity and cultural affiliation of human remains and cultural items are determined, the museum must send written notice of determination to the affected Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations and the NAGPRA Program for publication in the Federal Register.



Posted: November 28, 2018
More: irrigation, water

This rule revises regulations addressing electric power utilities of the Colorado River, Flathead, and San Carlos Indian irrigation projects to use plain language, update definitions, lengthen a regulatory deadline, and make other minor changes.


Various statutes provide the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) with authority to issue this regulation and for administering electric power utilities for the Colorado River, Flathead (Mission Valley Power), and San Carlos Indian irrigation projects. For example, see 5 U.S.C. 301; 25 U.S.C. 13; 25 U.S.C. 385c; 43 Stat. 475-76; 45 Stat. 210-13; 49 Stat. 1039-40; 49 Stat. 1822-23; 54 Stat. 422; 62 Stat. 269-73; 65 Stat. 254; 99 Stat. 319-20. Each of these power projects provides energy, transmission, and distribution of electrical services to customers in their respective service areas. BIA (or the contracting/compacting Indian Tribe) provides oversight and limited technical assistance for power projects and conducts operations and maintenance of the distribution systems.


The regulations addressing BIA's administration of the power utilities are at 25 CFR part 175, Indian Electric Power Utilities. This final rule updates the regulations for the first time since 1991.



Posted: November 28, 2018
More: hearth act, quinault, washington

On October 31, 2018, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) approved the Quinault Indian Nation's (Tribe) leasing regulations under the Helping Expedite and Advance Responsible Tribal Homeownership Act of 2012 (HEARTH Act). With this approval, the Tribe is authorized to enter into residential and business leases without further BIA approval.


The HEARTH Act makes a voluntary, alternative land leasing process available to Tribes, by amending the Indian Long-Term Leasing Act of 1955, 25 U.S.C. 415. The HEARTH Act authorizes Tribes to negotiate and enter into agricultural and business leases of Tribal trust lands with a primary term of 25 years, and up to two renewal terms of 25 years each, without the approval of the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary). The HEARTH Act also authorizes Tribes to enter into leases for residential, recreational, religious, or educational purposes for a primary term of up to 75 years without the approval of the Secretary. Participating Tribes develop Tribal leasing regulations, including an environmental review process, and then must obtain the Secretary's approval of those regulations prior to entering into leases. The HEARTH Act requires the Secretary to approve Tribal regulations if the Tribal regulations are consistent with the Department of the Interior's (Department) leasing regulations at 25 CFR part 162 and provide for an environmental review process that meets requirements set forth in the HEARTH Act. This notice announces that the Secretary, through the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs, has approved the Tribal regulations for the Quinault Indian Nation.


The Department's regulations governing the surface leasing of trust and restricted Indian lands specify that, subject to applicable Federal law, permanent improvements on leased land, leasehold or possessory interests, and activities under the lease are not subject to State and local taxation and may be subject to taxation by the Indian Tribe with jurisdiction. See 25 CFR 162.017. As explained further in the preamble to the final regulations, the Federal government has a strong interest in promoting economic development, self-determination, and Tribal sovereignty. 77 FR 72,440, 72,447-48 (December 5, 2012). The principles supporting the Federal preemption of State law in the field of Indian leasing and the taxation of lease-related interests and activities applies with equal force to leases entered into under Tribal leasing regulations approved by the Federal government pursuant to the HEARTH Act.


Section 5 of the Indian Reorganization Act, 25 U.S.C. 5108, preempts State and local taxation of permanent improvements on trust land. Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation v. Thurston County, 724 F.3d 1153, 1157 (9th Cir. 2013) (citing Mescalero Apache Tribe v. Jones, 411 U.S. 145 (1973)). Similarly, section 5108 preempts State taxation of rent payments by a lessee for leased trust lands, because “tax on the payment of rent is indistinguishable from an impermissible tax on the land.” See Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Stranburg, No. 14-14524, *13-*17, n.8 (11th Cir. 2015). In addition, as explained in the preamble to the revised leasing regulations at 25 CFR part 162, Federal courts have applied a balancing test to determine whether State and local taxation of non-Indians on the reservation is preempted. White Mountain Apache Tribe v. Bracker, 448 U.S. 136, 143 (1980). The Bracker balancing test, which is conducted against a backdrop of “traditional notions of Indian self-government,” requires a particularized examination of the relevant State, Federal, and Tribal interests. We hereby adopt the Bracker analysis from the preamble to the surface leasing regulations, 77 FR at 72,447-48, as supplemented by the analysis below.


The strong Federal and Tribal interests against State and local taxation of improvements, leaseholds, and activities on land leased under the Department's leasing regulations apply equally to improvements, leaseholds, and activities on land leased pursuant to Tribal leasing regulations approved under the HEARTH Act. Congress's overarching intent was to “allow Tribes to exercise greater control over their own land, support self-determination, and eliminate bureaucratic delays that stand in the way of homeownership and economic development in Tribal communities.” 158 Cong. Rec. H. 2682 (May 15, 2012). The HEARTH Act was intended to afford Tribes “flexibility to adapt lease terms to suit [their] business and cultural needs” and to “enable [Tribes] to approve leases quickly and efficiently.” Id. at 5-6.


Assessment of State and local taxes would obstruct these express Federal policies supporting Tribal economic development and self-determination, and also threaten substantial Tribal interests in effective Tribal government, economic self-sufficiency, and territorial autonomy. See Michigan v. Bay Mills Indian Community, 134 S. Ct. 2024, 2043 (2014) (Sotomayor, J., concurring) (determining that “[a] key goal of the Federal Government is to render Tribes more self-sufficient, and better positioned to fund their own sovereign functions, rather than relying on Federal funding”). The additional costs of State and local taxation have a chilling effect on potential lessees, as well as on a Tribe that, as a result, might refrain from exercising its own sovereign right to impose a Tribal tax to support its infrastructure needs. See id. at 2043-44 (finding that State and local taxes greatly discourage Tribes from raising tax revenue from the same sources because the imposition of double taxation would impede Tribal economic growth).



Posted: November 27, 2018
More: icwa, information collection

In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Indian Health Service (IHS) has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request for extension of approval of the information collection titled, “Addendum to Declaration for Federal Employment, Child Care and Indian Child Care Worker Positions,” Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Control Number 0917-0028.


Proposed Collection Title: Addendum to Declaration for Federal Employment, Child Care and Indian Child Care Worker Positions (OMB No. 0917-0028). Type of Information Collection Request: Extension, without revision, of currently approved information collection, 0917-0028, Addendum to Declaration for Federal Employment, Child Care and Indian Child Care Worker Positions. There are no program changes or adjustments in burden hours. Form(s): Addendum to Declaration for Federal Employment, Child Care and Indian Child Care Worker Positions. Need and Use of Information Collection: This is a request for approval of the collection of information as required by section 408 of the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act, Public Law (Pub. L.) 101-630, 104 Stat. 4544, and 25 United States Code (U.S.C.) §§ 3201-3210.


The IHS is required to compile a list of all authorized positions within the IHS where the duties and responsibilities involve regular contact with, or control over, Indian children; and to conduct an investigation of the character of each individual who is employed, or is being considered for employment, in a position having regular contact with, or control over, Indian children. 25 U.S.C. 3207(a)(1) and (2). Title 25 U.S.C. 3207(a)(3) requires regulations prescribing the minimum standards of character for individuals appointed to positions involving regular contact with, or control over, Indian children, and section 3207(b) provides that such standards shall ensure that no such individuals have been found guilty of, or entered a plea of nolo contendere or guilty to any felonious offense, or any two or more misdemeanor offenses, under Federal, State, or Tribal law involving crimes of violence; sexual assault, molestation, exploitation, contact or prostitution; crimes against persons; or offenses committed against children.


In addition, 34 U.S.C. 20351 (formerly codified at 42 U.S.C. 13041, which was transferred to 34 U.S.C. 20351) requires each agency of the Federal Government, and every facility operated by the Federal Government (or operated under contract with the Federal Government), that hires (or contracts for hire) individuals involved with the provision of child care services to children under the age of 18 to assure that all existing and newly hired employees undergo a criminal history background check. The background investigation is to be initiated through the personnel program of the applicable Federal agency. This section requires employment applications for individuals who are seeking work for an agency of the Federal Government, or for a facility or program operated by (or through contract with) the Federal Government, in positions involved with the provision of child care services to children under the age of 18, to contain a question asking whether the individual has ever been arrested for or charged with a crime involving a child, and if so, requiring a description of the disposition of the arrest or charge.



Posted: November 26, 2018
More: grand ronde, land-into-trust, oregon

The Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs has made a final determination to acquire 25.49 acres, more or less into trust for the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon on October 31, 2018.


This notice is published in the exercise of authority delegated by the Secretary of the Interior to the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs by part 209 of the Departmental Manual, and is published to comply with the requirement of 25 CFR 151.12(c)(2)(ii) that notice of the decision to acquire land in trust be promptly published in the Federal Register.


On October 31, 2018, the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs issued a decision to accept land in trust for Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon under the authority of The Grand Ronde Restoration Act of November 22, 1983, Public Law 98-165 and Section 5 of the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 (48 Stat. 984).



Posted: November 23, 2018
More: bie, information collection

In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, we, the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) are proposing a new information collection to gain an understanding of processes and practices within BIE schools.


Abstract: The purpose of the Human Capital Management Strengths and Needs Assessment process is to gain an understanding of processes and practices within BIE schools in five areas including: Hiring, retention, staff support and development, learning environment, school culture and community engagement. Information will be collected from school staff members, residential staff members, school board members, and parents through online surveys. The goal of collecting this information is to capture the perspective of stakeholders when considering a school's strengths and areas of improvement in relation to human capital functions. The BIE will use the information collected from this process to provide targeted individualized support to schools and to inform institutional change and improvement in areas including but not limited to hiring, professional development, and retention.



Posted: November 23, 2018
More: california, federal recognition, southern sierra miwuk

The Department of the Interior (Department) gives notice that the Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs (AS-IA) proposes to determine that the petitioner, Southern Sierra Miwuk Nation (SSM), is not an Indian Tribe within the meaning of Federal law. This notice is based on a determination that SSM does not meet one of the seven mandatory criteria for a government-to-government relationship with the United States. This proposed finding is based on only one criterion.


Pursuant to 25 CFR 83.10(h), the Department gives notice that the AS-IA proposes to determine that the Southern Sierra Miwuk Nation (SSM, Petitioner #82), c/o William H. Leonard, 4630 Ben Hur Road, Mariposa, California 95338, is not an Indian Tribe within the meaning of the Federal law. This notice is based on a preliminary finding that the petitioner fails to satisfy one of the seven mandatory criteria for acknowledgement set forth in 25 CFR 83.7(a) through (g), and thus, does not meet the requirements for a government-to-government relationship with the United States.


The Department received a letter of intent from the petitioner under the name “American Indian Council of Mariposa County” (AICMC) on April 24, 1982, and designated it Petitioner #82. The petitioner submitted a narrative and partial documentation on April 19, 1984. The Department replied with an “obvious deficiency” (OD) review letter on May 1, 1985. The petitioner responded with documentation on December 12, 1986. At the request of the petitioner, the Department sent a second OD review letter on April 11, 1988. The Department received the petitioner's response on January 16, 1998. The Department then placed Petitioner #82 on the “Ready, Waiting for Active Consideration” list.


Active consideration began on November 1, 2010, after which the Department asked for an updated membership list and any other materials within 60 days (70 FR 16514). The petitioner requested an “extension of time to submit documentation,” and the Department received the petitioner's submission on February 8, 2011, containing documentation, meeting minutes, membership list, articles, newspapers, and governing documents.


During review of Petitioner #82's documented petition, OFA identified technical issues with the petitioner's membership files that needed to be resolved in order to complete the review for the PF. For this reason, the AS-IA extended the original due date for issuance of the PF, from November 1, 2011 to April 30, 2012. During further review, additional technical issues with the petitioner's membership vital records arose, and the AS-IA found good cause to suspend the issuance of the PF under 83.10(g).


On July 31, 2015, the Department issued a final rule that revised the acknowledgment regulations and provided the petitioner the opportunity to choose to complete the evaluation either under the revised 2015 regulations or under the 1994 regulations (80 FR 37862-37895). Petitioner #82 decided to continue with the review of its petition under the 1994 regulations. Active consideration resumed, with the AS-IA ultimately extending the deadline for this PF to November 16, 2018.



Posted: November 21, 2018
More: eis, gaming, land-into-trust, little river, michigan, two-part determination

This notice advises the public that the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) as lead agency, with the Township of Fruitport, County of Muskegon, Little River Band of Ottawa Indians (Tribe), Federal Highway Administration, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), serving as cooperating agencies, intends to file a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) with the EPA in connection with the Tribe's application for transfer into trust by the United States of approximately 60 acres for gaming and other purposes to be located the Township of Fruitport, Muskegon County, Michigan. This notice also announces that the DEIS is now available for public review and that a public hearing will be held to receive comments on the DEIS.

Public review of the DEIS is part of the administrative process for the evaluation of the Tribe's application to the BIA for the Federal trust acquisition of approximately 60 acres in the Township of Fruitport, Muskegon County, Michigan, upon which the Tribe proposes to develop a casino, hotel, parking, and other supporting facilities. A Notice of Intent was published in the Federal Register on September 21, 2015, as well as published in The Muskegon Chronicle. The BIA held a public scoping meeting for the project on October 15, 2015, at Fruitport Middle School, 3113 East Pontaluna Road, Fruitport, Michigan 49415.



Posted: November 21, 2018
More: california, campo, eis, energy, solar

This notice advises the public that the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), as lead agency, with the Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Campo Indian Reservation (Tribe) as a cooperating agency, intends to gather information necessary for preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed Campo Wind Project, located on the Campo Indian Reservation (Reservation) in southeastern San Diego County, approximately 60 miles east of San Diego, California. Construction of the Campo Wind Project is subject to BIA approval of a lease and sublease, which, as proposed, is a major Federal action under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended. A brief description of the proposed action is provided below in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section. This notice also announces a public scoping meeting to identify potential issues, concerns, and alternatives to be considered in the EIS. The scoping process will include notice to the public and Federal, State, local, and Tribal agencies of the proposed action.



Posted: November 15, 2018
More: arizona, hopi, information collection, navajo

In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, we, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) are proposing to renew an information collection.


Abstract: This information collection is authorized under 25 CFR 161, which implements the Navajo-Hopi Indian Relocation Amendments Act of 1980, 94 Stat. 929, and the Federal court decisions of Healing v. Jones, 174 F. Supp.211 (D Ariz. 1959) (Healing I), Healing v. Jones, 210 F. Supp. 126 (D. Ariz. 1962), aff'd 363 U.S. 758 (1963) (Healing II), Hopi Tribe v. Watt, 530 F. Supp. 1217 (D. Ariz. 1982), and Hopi Tribe v. Watt, 719 F.2d 314 (9th Cir. 1983).


This information collection allows BIA to receive the information necessary to determine whether an applicant to obtain, modify, or assign a grazing permit on Navajo Partitioned Lands is eligible and complies with all applicable grazing permit requirements. BIA, in coordination with the Navajo Nation, will continue to collect grazing permit information up to and beyond the initial reissuing of the grazing permits, likely within a 1-3 year time period from the date of publication of this notice. The data is collected by electronic global positioning systems and field office interviews by BIA & Navajo Nation staff. The data is maintained by BIA's Navajo Partitioned Lands office. The burden hours for this continued collection of information are reflected in the Estimated Total Annual Hour Burden in this notice.


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