An agreement between the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the federal government over long-disputed water rights is taking a major step forward.
A well-known Pueblo artist can't sue the police officers who pointed an assault rifle at him, handcuffed him and detained him, a court has ruled.
Get ready for round two. A federal appeals court will take up the Indian Child Welfare Act on January 22, 2020.
Tribal leaders have practical reasons for not siding for or against President Trump's impeachment.
A federal appeals court overturned an death row inmate’s conviction, saying attorneys in his case 'dropped the ball' by failing to challenge the state’s evidence.
President Trump authorized creation of an eight-member panel to coordinate the federal response to the problem of murdered and missing indigenous women.


The slap heard round the world, or at least Indian Country, has caused quite the commotion.

Appearing in public with President Donald Trump can be toxic. How did it go for the tribal leaders who met with him at the White House?

The work of a Choctaw Nation artist inspired the name of a government-wide initiative aimed at addressing the crisis of missing and murdered Native Americans.

He didn't offend anyone. He didn't brag about himself. He didn't lash out at his opponents. He was just the president, among a group of tribal leaders.

Two employees of the Ute Tribe were suspended after they complained about being sexually harassed by their supervisor.

Before the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, more than a quarter of American Indian and Alaska Native children were removed from their homes.

Through two top cabinet officials, the Trump administration has signaled its support for a proposed settlement of the reserved water right claims of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.

A House committee gave approval to a comprehensive marijuana reform bill that would decriminalize the drug while erasing pot convictions stretching back decades.

Efforts to protect Native women and children from violence and to address the crisis of missing, murdered and trafficked Native Americans are being thrust into fresh partisan rancor on Capitol Hill.

The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs had a busy day, taking up #MMIW legislation and Native veterans issues.

Tribal leaders went before Congress to demand the government address longstanding problems in Indian Country – and not for the first time.

A Rosebud Sioux citizen wants to revive an old tradition of governance which is made up of a council of leaders, which would maintain the language, history and culture of the tribe.

With expanded protections for Native women and children still in doubt on Capitol Hill, key lawmakers are advancing legislation to address the crisis of the missing and murdered in tribal communities.

U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared split on whether the family of a Mexican teen who was shot across the border and killed by a Border Patrol agent in Texas can sue the agent.

A lawsuit in federal court challenges the proposed expansion of the Rosebud Coal Mine in Montana.

The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes are in a long-running dispute with a non-Indian company that refuses to pay for the storage of hazardous waste.

The Dakota Access Pipeline has experienced 12 spills of more than 6,100 gallons of crude oil in less than two years of operation.

The Acoma Shield is finally coming home after years in legal and political limbo.

Citizens of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation are suing leaders of their tribe for allegedly trespassing on their land.

'It’s going to take a long time for the harmony between us as people and Mother Earth to be completely restored, but this is a beginning.'

A bipartisan bill to address child abuse and neglect in tribal communities has the support of Indian Country organizations.

The battle over the Indian Child Welfare Act is far from over as tribes continue to defend the landmark law in the courts.

The fate of DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, is in the hands of the nation's highest court.

The nation's highest court continues to keep Indian Country in the dark when it comes to one of the most contentious cases in recent history.

Fawn Sharp grew up steeped in the tribal activist culture of the Pacific Northwest.

Native pipeline fighters celebrated the death of a state law aimed at preventing them from protesting against the Keystone XL Pipeline.

The Native community is outraged after police officer struck a Native middle school girl while trying to break up a fight.

One spring day in 2005, a man in a crisp brown uniform stood before a group created by Congress to fix rural Alaska’s lack of cops. In his soft-spoken way, Simeon Askoak explained his dilemma.

The wind speaks in this place. Sometimes it’s loud and abrasive and seeks to humble those who have failed to listen to the truths it has breathed upon them.

The Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians suffer from the highest rates of all forms of harassment, according to an employee study.