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At least 10 tribes adopt laws to recognize same-sex mariage






Tim LaCroix, left, a member of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians in Michigan, married Gene Barfield under tribal law in March 2013. Photo from Wagner College

At least 10 tribes have adopted laws to recognize same-sex marriage, The Advocate reports.

The Coquille Tribe of Oregon was the first to go public with its equality marriage ordinance. Now tribes in Connecticut, Washington, Michigan, California, Oklahoma and Minnesota a part of a movement that has swept across dozens of states and the federal government.

"People who are gay or lesbian could not marry the person they love on this reservation and now they can," Maggie Edwards, a council member for the Puyallup Tribe of Washington, said in the Puyallup Tribal News last week.

The two largest tribes in the U.S. -- Navajo Nation and the Cherokee Nation -- enacted laws that do not recognize same-sex marriage.

Get the Story:
These Native-American Tribes Are Pioneering Marriage Equality (The Advocate 7/28)