indianz.com your internet resource indianz.com on facebook indianz.com on twitter indianz.com on Google+ indianz.com on soundcloud
phone: 202 630 8439
The University of Tulsa College of Law - Master's in Indian Law
Advertise on Indianz.Com
Home > News > Headlines
Print   Subscribe
Lakota Country Times: Oglala Sioux Tribe opens nursing home

Filed Under: Health | National
More on: elders, lakota country times, nebraska, oglala sioux, shakopee
     
   

Veterans helped with the flags circling the dedication ceremonies of the new Oglala Sioux Tribe nursing home near Whiteclay, Nebraska. Photo courtesy Jerry Matthews

OST Nursing Home dedicated, valuable contributors thanked
Six residents admitted, goal to add two per week
By Tom Crash
Lakota Country Times Correspondent
lakotacountrytimes.com

WHITECLAY, Neb. – On Thursday, September 29, the Oglala Sioux Tribe dedicated the new OST Nursing Home, a 60-bed, 55,000 square-foot facility located on tribal land in Nebraska, just south of Whiteclay.

Lyle Jack, a past tribal council representative from Pine Ridge was master of ceremonies, Tom Poor Bear, OST vice president gave the welcome while Leroy Louden, past Nebraska state senator talked history and Oyuhkpe drum group sang the honoring songs. Gary Ruse, financial advisor, Mario Gonzalez and Richard Rangel, general contractor were honored along with Will Isham of First National Bank of Gordon were honored with star quilts.

“The first resolution for a nursing home was in 1968 but it was 2003/2004 when we passed a council resolution requesting money from Shakopee,” said Kathy Janis, who was on the tribal council in the beginning and followed through with the project through administration after administration whether she was on the council or not and currently serves as the board chair on the board with Leonard Little Finger and Duane Brewer.

“We struggled getting the $13.5 million loan through different councils and Shakopee, we worked with Rural Water to get water infrastructure in place, navigated through a work stoppage caused by TERO and negotiated through tribal, state and federal regulations and now it’s open and we’re accepting residents," Janis said. "It is worth all of the headaches and struggles to see it open.”


Royalty from the Oglala Sioux Tribe with a resident of the new Oglala Sioux Tribe nursing home near Whiteclay, Nebraska. Photo courtesy Jerry Matthews

Ron Ross heads up Rural Health Development, a management company that manages 23 nursing homes, 20 in Nebraska, two in Iowa and one in Wyoming and now has a 24th with the OST Nursing Home. Native American Health Management is the local group, they have a minimum five year management contract to oversee the new facility, Susan Pourier was hired as the new manager and works side by side with a preceptor, Diane Ross.

“This has been a huge challenge. I wish it hadn’t taken so long: every time I‘m around people here, they’re expressing their appreciation for helping to make this happen,” said Gary Ruse, financial advisor. "Sure we had to work our way through state and tribal challenges but Shakopee and their loan requirements was the biggest challenge. Their lawyer would put together a list of requirements that needed to be fulfilled, you’d get that completed then there would be a whole new list, the due diligence requirements stared at 2-3 pages and ended up with over 400 items.”

At the present time there are six residents and we’re looking at adding two residents per week, stated Susan Pourier, nursing home manager. "We have 25 employees covering housekeeping, laundry, maintenance, dietary, nursing and office, eventually we could have 80-100 full and part time workers, employees not just from Pine Ridge but all across the reservation," she said. "We have 64 resident applications and 300 job applications right now."

“Our goal is adding two residents a week, we are waiting for the state inspection, we need that certification so we can bill for services,” said Diane Ross. “We are going at a slow pace, we want each new resident to have a successful transition to our facility, to feel comfortable, to get acclimatized to the building and staff.”


The Oglala Sioux Tribe honored Mario Gonzalez, second from left, Gary Ruse and Richard Rangel for their work in making the new nursing home a reality. Photo courtesy of Jerry Matthews

"We start with the application for new residents, we need a doctor’s orders that require services, we need a physical and medical history and in all of this, we need to make sure that each resident’s needs don’t exceed what we are able to provide," added Pourier. "If we are sure we can provide the necessary services and they are eligible for Medicaid then we transition them into the facility. We then do our own physical. We’re licensed in Nebraska and we work with the Gordon Clinic. As we add residents, we’ll add staff.”

Although it has just started, there has been a good deal of dialogue about adding another wing with 20 additional beds. The council has already passed a resolution in support. Somewhere between $3-5 million would be required; it could be an additional loan from Shakopee, a Rural Development grant or loan or a bond issued to cover the costs.

“When the tribe did their first survey, they found over 400 tribal members in nursing homes across South Dakota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Montana and Minnesota – we are now able to start bringing home our elders who are staying a long ways from home,” said Janis. “It seemed to take forever to get this project to fruition but we now have a beautiful facility where our elders will live out their years close to family and friends, it is an exciting time for the Oglala Lakota Nation and our tribal members.”

Find the award-winning Lakota Country Times on the Internet, Facebook and Twitter and download the new Lakota Country Times app today.


Copyright © Indianz.Com
More headlines...
Stay Connected:
On Facebook

On Twitter

On Google+

On SoundCloud
Local Links:
Federal Register | Indian Gaming | Jobs & Notices | In The Hoop | Message Board
Latest News:
Pojoaque Pueblo loses big decision in gaming dispute with state (4/24)
Supreme Court takes no action on long-running tribal land case (4/24)
Yakama Nation landowners see $68M in Cobell buy-back offers (4/24)
Tim Giago: Sovereignty at risk with Donald Trump in White House (4/24)
Mark Trahant: Donald Trump & Republicans can't seem to govern (4/24)
Native Sun News Today: Chickasaw citizen donates prom dresses (4/24)
Steve Russell: The BEST advertisement for education in America (4/24)
Arlana Bennett: Picking cans with my father became our tradition (4/24)
Terese Mailhot: Maybe some people should be able to play Indian (4/24)
Charles Kader: Tribal communities still face threats to their lands (4/24)
3rd suspect sought in connection with death of elderly Native man (4/24)
Mashantucket Tribe expresses interest in growing industrial hemp (4/24)
Shutdown of federal government looms ahead of April 28 deadline (4/24)
Confederate monuments start coming down as Jackson stays put (4/24)
Blackfeet Nation citizens approve historic water rights settlement (4/21)
Native Sun News Today: Cheyenne River Sioux woman still walking (4/21)
James Giago Davies: Our future is not bleak but bright with promise (4/21)
Rosalyn LaPier: Tradition blends with science in tribal communities (4/21)
Simon Moya-Smith: Media continues to peddle in Indian stereotypes (4/21)
Steven Newcomb: Bill in California dehumanizes indigenous peoples (4/21)
American Indian Library Association battles Trump's big budget cut (4/21)
Navajo Nation citizen faces death penalty for murder of tribal officer (4/21)
Meskwaki Tribe diversifies economy with barbecue sauces and more (4/21)
Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribe must keep fighting despite gaming win (4/21)
Native Sun News Today: Body of missing Cheyenne River man found (4/20)
Ivan Star Comes Out: True tribal histories are concealed in America (4/20)
Steve Russell: Thoughts about sovereignty and tribal governments (4/20)
Dwanna Robertson: Dispelling a common myth about tribal gaming (4/20)
Whiteclay liquor stores ordered to shut down after losing licenses (4/20)
Cherokee Nation blames pharmaceutical industry for opioid crisis (4/20)
Eastern Cherokee citizens back chief amid call for impeachment (4/20)
North Carolina woman punished for abducting Cherokee children (4/20)
Ramapough Lenape Nation denied permit for anti-pipeline camp (4/20)
Ho-Chunk Nation remains confident as rival tribe sues over casino (4/20)
Nottawaseppi Huron Band invests casino funds in unique project (4/20)
Pechanga Band reaches midway point of $285M casino expansion (4/20)
More data needed to address human trafficking in Indian Country (4/19)
Senate Indian Affairs Committee set for 1st field oversight hearing (4/19)
Navajo Nation Council rejects bill to change name to 'Dine Nation' (4/19)
Non-Indian tenant loses bid to stay on Colorado River Reservation (4/19)
Native Sun News Today: Cheyenne River citizen opens bookstore (4/19)
Cheyenne-Arapaho citizen honored for law enforcement service (4/19)
Cronkite News: Attorney General links sanctuary cities to gangs (4/19)
Anna Hohag: Bringing indigenous science to water management (4/19)
Dakota Access Pipeline announces May 14 as first date of service (4/19)
more headlines...

Home | Arts & Entertainment | Business | Canada | Cobell Lawsuit | Education | Environment | Federal Recognition | Federal Register | Forum | Health | Humor | Indian Gaming | Indian Trust | Jack Abramoff Scandal | Jobs & Notices | Law | National | News | Opinion | Politics | Sports | Technology | World

Indianz.Com Terms of Service | Indianz.Com Privacy Policy
About Indianz.Com | Advertise on Indianz.Com

Indianz.Com is a product of Noble Savage Media, LLC and Ho-Chunk, Inc.