Federal Register


Posted: June 14, 2019
More: iowa, nagpra

The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Effigy Mounds National Monument has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to Effigy Mounds National Monument. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


The human remains described below, with the exception of one metatarsal fragment from the Great Bear Mound Group originally misidentified as a bone tool, were stolen from Effigy Mounds National Monument in 1990 and recovered in 2011 and 2012. After examination by an osteologist, most, but not all, of the remains were able to be matched with their original documentation. The recovered remains which were not able to be matched were cataloged as a separate accession (#212) and are accounted for in the total minimum number of individuals in Effigy Mounds National Monument collections. These fragmentary remains will not be described separately in this notice or any future notice. Items found with the stolen remains that could not be reunited with their original accession are described here as cultural items removed at unknown dates from unknown sites within the boundaries of Effigy Mounds National Monument.


Because the mounds at Effigy Mounds National Monument are burial mounds, all artifacts that come from these mounds are considered funerary objects. All of the funerary objects are considered associated funerary objects because, even though these types of items likely had other uses within the culture, it is reasonable to believe that these specific funerary objects were made exclusively for burial purposes and therefore pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A) are associated funerary objects regardless of the location of the connected human remains.


At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual, were removed from an unknown site likely within the boundaries of Effigy Mounds National Monument in Allamakee or Clayton County, IA. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.


At unknown dates, 59 cultural items were removed from unknown sites within the boundaries of Effigy Mounds National Monument in Allamakee or Clayton County, IA. The 59 associated funerary objects are 55 animal bones, one unfired clay fragment, and three stones.



Posted: June 13, 2019
More: nagpra, texas

The Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as “The Consulted Tribes”).


On November 18, 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Chimney Shelter Site (X41CX10) in Crockett County, TX. The Chimney Shelter Site was one of several rockshelter sites excavated during the Crockett County Excavations project, a highway salvage project conducted by the State of Texas preceding the construction of Interstate Highway 10. The partial remains of one adult individual were found in the southern half of the rockshelter under a mound of limestone rocks. Small patches of degraded plant material found under the human remains were either matting or, (more likely, based on excavation notes) grass. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present (no other artifacts were recovered from the rockshelter).



Posted: June 13, 2019
More: nagpra, texas

The Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma.


In 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Lowden Site, in Hood County, TX. The site, located on private property was initially surveyed by E.B. Jelks and E.H. Moorman in 1953, for the River Basin Surveys project. The site was later excavated from March 7, 1968 to August 28, 1968, prior to the inundation of Lake Granbury. The burial was found in November 1968, while the site was being destroyed for construction of a dam. The burial was uncovered outside of the original excavation area as a result of plowing by a pay scraper. The well-preserved human remains belong to an adult male. When found, the backbones were oriented north and south, with the head facing south. Whether the individual was in an extended or flexed position is unknown. The ribs were facing east, indicating that the individual was placed on their left side. The burial was located six to eight feet below the surface in sandy fill with a six to eight inch layer of limestone fragments. No known individuals were identified. The three associated funerary objects are one point, one scraper, and one dart point. Because the burial was disturbed by a scraper plow, the location of associated funerary objects in relation to the human remains is unknown.


The site is dated to A.D. 1000 to 1200, based on the presence of Scallorn, and Perdiz points in the occupation area of the site. The original excavators determined that the people who occupied the Lowden site were Caddoan.



Posted: June 13, 2019
More: nagpra, texas

The Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Tonkawa Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as “The Tribes”).


At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Lagow Sand Pit Site (41DL79), in Dallas County, TX. The Lagow Sand Pit Site was initially a geological survey completed by Dr. Ellis Shuler of the Southern Methodist University Department of Geology. His initial research (Schuler 1923) indicated that the human remains were related to the Pleistocene bone bed in which they were found. Later research (Oakley and Howell, 1961; Crook, 1961), though, found that the burial was intrusional, and dates to the early Archaic. Though the burial was not complete when it was uncovered, the human remains appear to be from a single individual. There are no known individuals. There are no associated funerary objects.



Posted: June 13, 2019
More: nagpra, texas

The Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma.


In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Upper Tucker Site, in Montague County, TX, as part of the Wichita Project excavation. Although no burials or human remains were reported for this site in any of the associated documentation, including the official published report, one human tooth is attributed to this site No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.


The Upper Tucker Site is dated to the late 18th century. Cultural affiliation is with the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes.



Posted: June 13, 2019
More: nagpra, texas

The Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma.


During 1965 and 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from the two sites in Cooke County, TX. Burial 1 is from the Chicken House Site (X41CO6/41CO156). The one individual, a female 18-25 years old, was found on the floor of a cache pit. She had been placed in a semi-flexed positon, and lay on her back, facing the northeast. The hips and knees were flexed, and the legs turned toward the left. The arms were placed down at the side, and were bent at the elbows, with ulnae and radii parallel to the humeri, and the hands next to the shoulders. The bones indicate signs of disease. The skull, left wrist, and left hand were missing at the time of excavation. No known individuals were identified. Although artifacts were found in the cache pit, there were no funerary objects associated with this burial.


Two burials were recovered from unnamed site X41CO3 during a survey and soil profiling. The first burial was located on the surface, and consists of two skull fragments and one charred unidentifiable bone fragment. The second burial was also located on the surface, and consists of a single human tooth and one unidentifiable bone fragment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present for either of these two burials.


Both sites are dated from A.D. 850 to 1000, and fit the Plains Woodland Pattern, but they also begin to approach the Plains Village Pattern. Culturally, the people who occupied the sites were Caddoan.



Posted: June 13, 2019
More: nagpra, texas

The Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Comanche Nation, Oklahoma.


In 1967, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Morgan Jones site (41CB53), in Crosby County, TX. The human remains were found inside a rock shelter; caliche stones covered the mouth of the burial. The individual appears to be a young female, 13-15 years old. The human remains were placed in a flexed position on the right side, facing southwest towards the entrance of the rock shelter. Portions of the skeleton were missing, including the pelvis and most of the vertebrae, due to rodent disturbance. No known individuals were identified. The eight associated funerary objects are one whelk shell axe, three elk-tooth pendants, one brass buckle, one cinch buckle, one lump of blue-green pigment, and one textile. (One iron axe and 3,638 glass beads (403 white seed beads, 3,100 light blue beads, 131 dark blue beads, two green beads, and two donut-shaped beads) associated with this burial are currently missing from the collection. These items were transferred to an unknown location in Austin, TX, in March 1967, and efforts to find them have been unsuccessful.)


The Morgan Jones site dates from A.D. 1790 to the early 1800s, based on the brass cinch buckle found with the burial. According to correspondence from Curtis Tunnell (then the Texas State Archeologist), the brass cinch buckle is of Spanish-Mexican origin, and dates to the early 1800s. The plain brass buckle and axe are English or French. Based on the associated funerary objects, the cultural affiliation is definitively identified as Comanche.



Posted: June 13, 2019
More: colorado, nagpra

Fort Lewis College has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to Fort Lewis College. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Fort Lewis College professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kewa Pueblo, New Mexico (previously listed as the Pueblo of Santo Domingo); Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico (previously listed as the Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo (previously listed as the Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo of Texas); and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as “The Tribes”).


In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from La Plata County, CO. Individuals were collecting antlers on private land when they found the human remains on the surface of the Animas Valley, along the western cliff edges. Some scattered fragments found on the cliff suggest that the individual had originally been placed in a crevice in the cliff face. La Plata County Sheriff's deputies called to the scene turned over the majority of the bones to Fort Lewis College, where they were assigned catalog number FLC 500. The human remains consist of a cranium with dentition and a partial postcranial skeleton (R scapula, pelvic girdle, L femur, L tibia, and several ribs), of an adult male 40-55 years of age whose cranial and dental characteristics are highly consistent with Native American ancestry. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.


Sometime in the 1960s, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the vicinity of Berndt Hall on the Fort Lewis College campus in Durango, CO. The human remains of the individual, assigned catalog number FLC 609, consist of a cranium with dentition belonging to an adult male 35-45 years of age whose cranial characteristics are consistent with Native American ancestry. Based on other known archeological contexts from the immediate area, the notes accompanying the human remains state that they could plausibly be dated to BMIII to PI. There is no additional information regarding the circumstances under which the human remains arrived in the collection of the Department of Anthropology at Fort Lewis College. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.


Sometime in the mid- to later twentieth century a private landowner, Milo Dearien, came across the human remains of one individual during construction on 6440 County Road 203, north of Durango, in the north Animas Valley. Dearien transferred the human remains to Fort Lewis College in the mid-1980s. The human remains, consist of a cranium lacking teeth, belong to an adult female 30-45 years of age. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.


Based on the nature and location of the sites, the manner of burial, the treatment of the crania, the Native American biological characteristics of the crania, and the oral histories of the Ute peoples regarding life and death in the Durango region, the human remains in this notice are identified as Ute.



Posted: June 13, 2019
More: california, nagpra

The State Center Community College District—Fresno City College has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the State Center Community College District—Fresno City College. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the State Center Community College District—Fresno City College professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Big Sandy Rancheria of Western Mono Indians of California (previously listed as the Big Sandy Rancheria of Mono Indians of California); Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Cold Springs Rancheria of Mono Indians of California; Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California; Northfork Rancheria of Mono Indians of California; Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians of California; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California; Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract), California; Table Mountain Rancheria (previously listed as the Table Mountain Rancheria of California); Tejon Indian Tribe; Tule River Indian Tribe of the Tule River Reservation, California; and the Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California.


The California Valley Miwok Tribe, California; Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation, Nevada and Oregon; Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California; Jackson Band of Miwuk Indians (previously listed as the Jackson Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California); Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe of the Pyramid Lake Reservation, Nevada; Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, Nevada; Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; and the Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, Nevada were invited to consult, but did not participate.


Two non-federally recognized groups, the Dunlap Band of Mono Indians and the Traditional Choinumni Tribe, participated in consultation. One non-federally recognized group, the Wukchumni Tribe, was invited to consult, but did not participate.


Hereafter, all the Indian Tribes and non-federally recognized Indian groups listed in this section are referred to as “The Consulted and Notified Tribes and Groups.”



Posted: June 11, 2019
More: nagpra

The National Park Service is soliciting nominations for two members of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee. The Secretary of the Interior will appoint two members from nominations submitted by national museum organizations or national scientific organizations. The Review Committee was established by the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990 (NAGPRA), and is regulated by the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA).


The Review Committee is responsible for:


1. Monitoring the NAGPRA inventory and identification process;


2. Reviewing and making findings related to the identity or cultural affiliation of cultural items, or the return of such items;


3. Facilitating the resolution of disputes;


4. Compiling an inventory of culturally unidentifiable human remains and developing a process for disposition of such remains;


5. Consulting with Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations and museums on matters within the scope of the work of the Review Committee affecting such tribes or organizations;


6. Consulting with the Secretary of the Interior in the development of regulations to carry out NAGPRA; and


7. Making recommendations regarding future care of repatriated cultural items.


The Review Committee consists of seven members appointed by the Secretary of the Interior. The Secretary may not appoint Federal officers or employees to the Review Committee. Three members are appointed from nominations submitted by Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and traditional Native American religious leaders. At least two of these members must be traditional Indian religious leaders. Three members are appointed from nominations submitted by national museum or scientific organizations. One member is appointed from a list of persons developed and consented to by all of the other members.



Posted: June 10, 2019
More: bie, essa

The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) is proposing a rule developed using a negotiated rulemaking process, as required by the 2015 Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), for implementation of the Secretary of the Interior's obligation to define the standards, assessments, and accountability system consistent with ESSA for BIE-funded schools.


The Office of Indian Education Programs (OIEP), now the BIE, published the existing rule for Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), codified at 25 CFR part 30 (part 30), in the Federal Register on April 28, 2005 (70 FR 22178), effective May 31, 2005. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), as amended and reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), Public Law 107-110, required the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) to engage in a negotiated rulemaking process to define AYP. NCLB required that AYP be defined on a regional or Tribal basis, as appropriate, taking into account the unique circumstances and needs of BIE-funded schools and the students served by those schools and provided further that, consistent with the negotiated rulemaking requirement, the Secretary could use State definitions of AYP. The NCLB Negotiated Rulemaking Committee ultimately recommended a rule requiring the BIE to use the definition of AYP of the State in which a BIE-funded school is located, with the option for a Tribal governing body or school board to develop and implement alternative definitions of AYP. The existing part 30 resulted from that recommendation.


There are BIE-funded schools in 23 different States, each State having its own accountability system. As a result, under the existing rule, each State system has produced student achievement data for BIE-funded schools that is not comparable with data from BIE-funded schools following the requirements of other States. This outcome has created problems for the BIE in identifying under-performing schools, reporting, and in directing resources effectively.


On November 9, 2015, BIE published a notice of intent requesting nominations for members of a proposed negotiated rulemaking committee to recommend revisions to the existing part 30 AYP regulations (80 FR 69161). On December 10, 2015, ESEA was reauthorized and amended by the ESSA (Pub. L. 114-95). The ESSA requires the Secretary to use a negotiated rulemaking process to develop regulations to implement the Secretary's responsibility to define the standards, assessments, and accountability system, consistent with ESEA section 1111, for BIE-funded schools on a national, regional, or Tribal basis, as appropriate, taking into account the unique circumstances and needs of the schools and the students served by the schools. The requirement that the Secretary define the standards, assessments, and accountability system marks a significant expansion of requirements in the ESEA as amended by NCLB. The reauthorization of ESEA therefore required an update to the subject, scope, and issues that the proposed committee would address. On April 14, 2016, BIE announced its intent to expand the scope of the work of the committee and reopened the comment and nomination period, requesting comments and nominations by May 31, 2016 (81 FR 22039). The request for nominations was extended on August 17, 2016 (81 FR 54768). On January 18, 2017, a notice of proposed membership, request for nominations, and a request for comments was published (82 FR 5473). On September 14, 2017, taking into consideration the interests of the new Administration in participating fully in the negotiated rulemaking process, BIE published a new request for nominations and notice of intent to establish a negotiated rulemaking committee (82 FR 43199). On April 17, 2018, the BIE published a notice of proposed membership of the committee and a request for further nominations (83 FR 16806).



Posted: June 6, 2019
More: california, gaming, land-into-trust, redding

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is announcing a two-week extension of the comment period for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Proposed Redding Rancheria Fee-to-Trust and Casino Project, Shasta County, California. The BIA published a Notice of Availability on April 10, 2019.


On April 10, 2019, the BIA published in the Federal Register (84 FR 14391) a Notice of Availability for the DEIS the Proposed Redding Rancheria Fee-to-Trust and Casino Project, Shasta County, California. BIA then held a public hearing at the Redding Memorial Veterans Hall in Redding on May 20, 2019.


The DEIS has been prepared for the Redding Rancheria's (Tribe) application requesting that the United States acquire approximately 232 acres of land in trust in Shasta County, California. The proposed fee-to-trust property is located in an unincorporated part of Shasta County, California, approximately 1.6 miles northeast of the existing Redding Rancheria, and about two miles southeast of downtown Redding. The proposed trust property includes seven parcels, bound by Bechelli Lane on the north, private properties to the south, the Sacramento River on the west, and Interstate 5 on the east. The Tribe is proposing to construct a casino resort that includes a casino, hotel, event/convention center, outdoor amphitheater, retail center, and associated parking/infrastructure. The new facility would replace the Tribe's existing casino, and the Tribe would convert the existing casino buildings to a different Tribal use. Additional information on the proposed action, alternatives to the proposed action, and potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action and alternatives can be found in the DEIS.



Posted: June 6, 2019
More: california, liquor, mechoopda

This notice publishes the Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria's Alcoholic Beverage Ordinance #19 (Ordinance). The Ordinance regulates and controls the possession, sale, manufacture, and distribution of alcohol in conformity with the laws of the State of California.


Pursuant to the Act of August 15, 1953, Public Law 83-277, 67 Stat. 586, 18 U.S.C. 1161, as interpreted by the Supreme Court in Rice v. Rehner, 463 U.S. 713 (1983), the Secretary of the Interior shall certify and publish in the Federal Register notice of adopted liquor control ordinances for the purpose of regulating liquor transactions in Indian country. The Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria duly adopted Alcoholic Beverage Ordinance #19 on October 6, 2018.


This notice is published in accordance with the authority delegated by the Secretary of the Interior to the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs. I certify that the Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria duly adopted Alcoholic Beverage Ordinance #19 on October 6, 2018.



Posted: June 6, 2019
More: bie

Pursuant to the Federal Advisory Committee Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA), the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) requests nominations of individuals to serve on the Advisory Board for Exceptional Children (Advisory Board). There will be four positions available. Board members will serve a staggered term of two years or three years from the date of their appointment. The BIE will consider nominations received in response to this request for nominations, as well as other sources.


The Advisory Board was established in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463. The following provides information about the Committee, the membership and the nomination process.


1. Objective and Duties


(a) Members of the Advisory Board will provide guidance, advice and recommendations with respect to special education and related services for children with disabilities in BIE-funded schools in accordance with the requirements of IDEA;


(b) The Advisory Board will:


(1) Provide advice and recommendations for the coordination of services within the BIE and with other local, State and Federal agencies;


(2) Provide advice and recommendations on a broad range of policy issues dealing with the provision of educational services to American Indian children with disabilities;


(3) Serve as advocates for American Indian students with special education needs by providing advice and recommendations regarding best practices, effective program coordination strategies, and recommendations for improved educational programming;


(4) Provide advice and recommendations for the preparation of information required to be submitted to the Secretary of Education under 20 U.S.C. 1411(h)(2);


(5) Provide advice and recommend policies concerning effective inter/intra agency collaboration, including modifications to regulations, and the elimination of barriers to inter- and intra-agency programs and activities; and


(6) Report and direct all correspondence to the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs through the Director, BIE with a courtesy copy to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO).



Posted: May 31, 2019
More: eis, ho-chunk, igra, land-into-trust, off-reservation, section 20, two-part determination, wisconsin

This notice advises the public that the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), as lead agency, with the City of Beloit, Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Ho-Chunk Nation (Nation), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) serving as cooperating agencies, intends to file a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) with the EPA in connection with the Nation's application for transfer into trust by the United States of approximately 33 acres for gaming and other purposes in the City of Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin.


The Tribe proposes to develop a casino-hotel resort on approximately 33 acres in the City of Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin. The BIA published a Notice of Intent to prepare an EIS in the Federal Register on November 26, 2012 (77 FR 70460), and in The Daily News, The Janesville Gazette, and The Rockford Register Star. The BIA held a public scoping meeting on December 13, 2012, at Aldrich Middle School in Beloit, Wisconsin. The BIA published a Notice of Availability for the Draft EIS in the Federal Register on November 9, 2018 (83 FR 56096), and in The Daily News, The Janesville Gazette, and The Rockford Register Star. The BIA held a public hearing for the proposed project on December 11, 2018, at Aldrich Middle School.


Background: The Tribe's proposed project consists of the following components: (1) The Department of the Interior's (Department) transfer of approximately 33 acres from fee to trust status; (2) issuance of a determination by the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to Section 20 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, 25 U.S.C. 2719; and (3) the development of the trust parcel. The proposed casino-hotel resort would include a hotel, convention center, outdoor amphitheater, several restaurant facilities, waterpark, retail buildings, and parking facilities. Access to the project site would be provided via three driveways, one along Willowbrook Road and two along Colley Road. The following alternatives are considered in the FEIS: (1) Proposed Project; (2) Reduced Casino and Commercial Development; (3) Retail Development; and (4) No Action/No Development. The BIA identifies Alternative 1 the Preferred Alternative as discussed in the FEIS.


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