Posted: August 18, 2017
More: liquor, new mexico, pueblo

This notice publishes amendments to the Santa Clara Pueblo Liquor Code (Code). The Code regulates the control, possession, and sale of liquor on the Santa Clara Pueblo trust lands, in conformity with the laws of the State of New Mexico, where applicable and necessary.


Pursuant to the Act of August 15, 1953, Public Law 83-277, 67 Stat. 586, 18 U.S.C. 1161, as interpreted by the Supreme Court in Rice v. Rehner, 463 U.S. 713 (1983), the Secretary of the Interior shall certify and publish in the Federal Register notice of adopted liquor ordinances for the purpose of regulating liquor transactions in Indian country. The Santa Clara Pueblo Liquor Code, Resolution No. 2016-113, was duly adopted by the Tribal Council on September 12, 2016. The Santa Clara Pueblo, in furtherance of its economic and social goals, has taken positive steps to regulate retail sales of alcohol and use of revenues to combat alcohol abuse and its debilitating effects among individuals and family members within the reservation of Santa Clara Pueblo.


This notice is being published in accordance with the authority delegated by the Secretary of the Interior to the Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs (Department of Interior-Departmental Manual, 209 DM 8). I certify that Resolution No. 2016-113, the Santa Clara Pueblo Liquor Code, was duly adopted by the Tribal Council on September 12, 2016. This Code amends the previous liquor code as published in the Federal Register on June 27, 2001 (66 FR 34233).



Posted: August 16, 2017
More: grants

The Indian Health Service (IHS) Office of Public Health Support, Division of Epidemiology and Disease Prevention (DEDP), is accepting applications for a cooperative agreement for competitive supplemental funds to enhance activities in the Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Tribes and Urban Indian communities. This program is authorized under: The Public Health Service Act, at 42 U.S.C. 241, 247b(k)(2), 282, 284 and 285t. Funding for this award will be provided by: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) and the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). The authorities will be exercised through an Intra-Departmental Delegation of Authority (IDDA) with IHS to create a new funding opportunity for Tribal Epidemiology Centers: This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) under 93.231.


The Tribal Epidemiology Center (TEC) program was authorized by Congress in 1998 as a way to provide public health support to multiple Tribes and Urban Indian communities in each of the IHS Areas. The funding opportunity announcement is open to eligible Tribes, Tribal organizations, Indian organizations, intertribal consortia, and Urban Indian organizations, including currently-funded TECs.


TECs are uniquely positioned within Tribes, Tribal and Urban Indian organizations to conduct disease surveillance, research, prevention and control of disease, injury, or disability, and to assess the effectiveness of AI/AN public health programs. In addition, they can fill gaps in data needed for Government Performance and Results Act and Healthy People 2020 measures. Some of the existing TECs have already developed innovative strategies to monitor the health status of Tribes and Urban Indian communities, including development of Tribal health registries and use of sophisticated record linkage computer software to correct existing state data sets for racial misclassification. TECs work in partnership with IHS DEDP to provide a more accurate national picture of Indian health status. This program will utilize CDC and NIH funding to further the ongoing work of IHS and the TECs.


The mission of NIMHD is to promote minority health and to lead, coordinate, support, and assess the NIH effort to reduce and ultimately eliminate health disparities.


The NCEH has identified a public health gap in the nation's ability to link environmental hazards and exposure to chronic disease issues, and to provide information to a variety of audiences from a nationwide network of integrated health and environmental data that drives actions to improve health outcomes. The NCEH is seeking, through this announcement, to support the creation of a mechanism by which Tribal data can be submitted to the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network and further explore the application of Tribal data to environmental public health.



Posted: August 14, 2017
More: fy2018, grants

Pursuant to Section 814 of the Native American Programs Act of 1974 (NAPA), as amended, the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) is required to provide members of the public an opportunity to comment on proposed changes in interpretive rules and general statements of policy and to give notice of the final adoption of such changes no less than 30 days before such changes become effective. In accordance with notice requirements of NAPA, ANA herein describes proposed interpretive rules and general statements of policy that relate to ANA's funding opportunities beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2018. Changes to FY 2018 Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) will be based on the following previously published programs: Environmental Regulatory Enhancement (ERE) HHS-2017-ACF-ANA-NR-1221, Native American Language Preservation and Maintenance-Esther Martinez Immersion (EMI) HHS-2017-ACF-ANA-NB-1226, Native American Language Preservation and Maintenance (P&M) HHS-2017-ACF-ANA-NL-1235, Social and Economic Development Strategies (SEDS) HHS-2017-ACF-ANA-NA-1236, Social and Economic Development Strategies-Alaska (SEDS-AK) HHS-2015-ACF-ANA-NK-0960, and Native Youth Initiative for Leadership, Empowerment, and Development (ILEAD) HHS-2017-ACF-ANA-NC-1263. This notice of public comment also provides additional information about ANA's plan for administering grant programs.



Posted: August 14, 2017
More: grants

The Indian Health Service (IHS) Office of Clinical and Preventative Services, Division of Behavioral Health, is accepting applications for its Behavioral Health Integration Initiative (Short Title: BH2I) to plan, develop, implement, and evaluate behavioral health integration with primary care, community based settings, and/or integrating primary care, nutrition, diabetes care, and chronic disease management with behavioral health. This program is authorized under: The Snyder Act, 25 U.S.C. 13, and 25 U.S.C. 1665j. This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) under 93.933.


IHS supports changing the paradigm of mental health and substance use disorder services from being episodic, fragmented, specialty, and/or disease focused to incorporating it into the patient-centered home model. Research has shown that more than 70 percent of primary care visits stem from behavioral health issues. Depression is the most common type of mental illness, currently affecting more than a quarter of the U.S. adult population. With major depression currently the second leading cause of disability, it is clear that primary care settings have become an important access point for addressing both physical and behavioral health care needs. In addition, American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities experience alarming rates of suicide, alcohol and drug-related deaths, domestic and sexual violence, and homicide. Describing the burden of trauma within any population is difficult, however indicators in terms of socially destructive behaviors are often used to illustrate this public health issue that creates impact through lifespan accumulation and chronic stress. Studies now indicate that resulting trauma from such events can even be passed from one generation to the next, resulting in intergenerational and historical trauma. While mental health needs can often go untreated and even unnoticed, the lasting effects of childhood trauma into adulthood is often evident in physical manifestations leading to negative health consequences. These extreme disparities highlight an urgent need for improving access to mental health services in primary care for children and families through the integration of behavioral health services, including trauma-informed care, within primary care settings. In addition, recognizing that behavioral and physical health problems are interwoven, delivery of behavioral health services in primary care settings reduces stigma and discrimination, and the majority of people with behavioral health disorders treated within an integrated primary care setting have improved outcomes.



Posted: August 14, 2017
More: grants

The Indian Health Service (IHS) Office of Clinical and Preventive Services' Division of Behavioral Health is accepting applications for cooperative agreements for Preventing Alcohol-Related Deaths (PARD) through Social Detoxification. This program is authorized under: Snyder Act, 25 U.S.C. 13; Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2017, Public Law 115-31, 131 Stat. 135 (2017); and 25 U.S.C. 1665a. This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) under 93.933.

Alcohol-related deaths are 520 percent greater among the American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) population than the general United States population (IHS Trends in Indian Health, 2014). Providing social detoxification services is often a first step toward recovery for individuals with an alcohol use disorder to minimize physical harm, including death. Detoxification alone is not sufficient treatment for alcohol use disorder but is part of the continuum of care that fosters an individual's entry into treatment and rehabilitation. Alcohol use disorders are brain disorders and not evidence of moral weakness. All individuals with alcohol use disorders should be treated with respect and dignity at all times, in a nonjudgmental and supportive manner. Services should be completed in partnership with the individual and his or her social support network with due consideration for individual background, culture, preferences, gender identity, vulnerabilities, and strengths.



Posted: August 8, 2017
More: nagpra, tennessee

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District, Nashville, TN. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Lyon County, KY.



Posted: August 8, 2017
More: museum, nagpra, nevada

The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the University of Nevada, Reno, Anthropology Research Museum, have completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and in the physical custody of the University of Nevada, Reno, Anthropology Research Museum, Reno, NV. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from several sites near Pyramid Lake in Washoe County, NV.



Posted: August 8, 2017
More: nagpra, tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Archaeology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Archaeology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Archaeology, Nashville, TN. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Polk County, TN.



Posted: August 8, 2017
More: museums, nagpra, pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA. The human remains were removed from the Brakebill Mound site (40KN55), Knox County, TN.



Posted: August 8, 2017
More: meetings, nagpra

The July 2017 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee meeting has been postponed.


The 7-member Review Committee monitors and reviews the implementation of the inventory and identification processes and repatriation activities under Sections 5, 6, and 7 of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990.



Posted: August 7, 2017
More: coal, energy

The Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR) is repealing the Consolidated Federal Oil & Gas and Federal & Indian Coal Valuation Reform Final Rule, published July 1, 2016, and effective January 1, 2017. Simultaneously, ONRR is reinstating the valuation regulations governing the valuation of Federal oil, Federal gas, and Federal and Indian coal that were in effect before January 1, 2017.


This final rule repeals in its entirety the Consolidated Federal Oil & Gas and Federal & Indian Coal Valuation Reform Final Rule (2017 Valuation Rule) that ONRR published in the Federal Register on July 1, 2016 (81 FR 43338), and that was effective on January 1, 2017. The 2017 Valuation Rule made changes to existing regulations governing royalty valuation and reporting practices for oil, gas, and coal. As stated in the 2017 Valuation Rule's preamble, the purpose of implementing the rule was (1) to offer greater simplicity, certainty, clarity, and consistency in product valuation for mineral lessees and mineral revenue recipients; (2) to ensure that Indian mineral lessors receive the maximum revenue from coal resources on their land, consistent with the Secretary's trust responsibility and lease terms; (3) to decrease industry's cost of compliance and ONRR's cost to ensure industry compliance; and (4) to provide early certainty to industry and to ONRR that companies have paid every dollar due. 81 FR 43338.


After the 2017 Valuation Rule was published, however, ONRR discovered several significant defects in the rule that would have undermined its purpose and intent. In addition, during the same time period (July 1, 2016, to the present) we received numerous comments from the regulated community and other members of the public, both in response to the proposed rule of repeal that we published in the Federal Register on April 4, 2017, and in other public forums, that were highly critical of certain provisions in the rule.



Posted: August 4, 2017
More: class iii, compacts, crow creek sioux, gaming, south dakota

The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow Creek Reservation and the State of South Dakota entered into a compact superseding an existing Tribal-State compact governing Class III gaming; this notice announces approval of the Proposed Gaming Compact Between the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow Creek Reservation and the State of South Dakota governing Class III gaming.


Section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) requires the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) to publish in the Federal Register notice of approved Tribal-State compacts that are for the purpose of engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. See Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2701 et seq. All Tribal-State Class III compacts, including amendments, are subject to review and approval by the Secretary under 25 CFR 293.4. The Compact increases the number of permissible slot machines from 250 to 500, permits the Tribe to operate Class III gaming at a second location, and increases wager limits. The initial duration of the Compact is 10 years with automatic renewals every 10 years thereafter unless the agreement is terminated by the Tribe and the State. The Compact is approved.



Posted: August 1, 2017
More: alaska, ancs, ancsa

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) hereby provides constructive notice that it will issue an appealable decision approving conveyance of the surface estate in the lands described below to Tulkisarmute Incorporated, for the Native village of Tuluksak, pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971, as amended (ANCSA). As provided by ANCSA, the BLM will convey the subsurface estate in the same lands to Calista Corporation when the BLM conveys the surface estate to Tulkisarmute Incorporated.


As required by 43 CFR 2650.7(d), notice is hereby given that the BLM will issue an appealable decision to Tulkisarmute Incorporated. The decision approves conveyance of the surface estate in certain lands pursuant to ANCSA (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). As provided by ANCSA, the subsurface estate in the same lands will be conveyed to Calista Corporation when the surface estate is conveyed to Tulkisarmute Incorporated.



Posted: July 31, 2017
More: igra, nepa

The National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC or “the Commission”) is amending its protocol for categorical exclusions under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, Executive Order 11514, as amended, and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the procedural provisions of NEPA for certain NIGC actions.


On December 4, 2009, the Commission published a draft NEPA manual in the Federal Register (74 FR 63765). The purpose of the manual was to establish the Commission's NEPA-related policies and procedures and to integrate environmental considerations into the Commission's decision-making processes. The draft manual identified one type of major federal action performed under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) that triggered NEPA review, specifically, the approval of contracts for the management of Indian gaming facilities pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 2711. In addition to identifying major federal actions applicable to the Commission, the draft manual also established the Commission's NEPA-related roles and responsibilities and created a framework for the preparation of NEPA documentation appropriate for each level of environmental review. The draft manual also identified three categories of actions taken by the NIGC that are categorically excluded from further NEPA review. Categorical exclusions (CATEX) are actions that do not normally require preparation of an Environmental Assessment (EA) or Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), absent extraordinary circumstances.



Posted: July 31, 2017
More: bie, information collection

In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) is proposing to renew an information collection.


We, the BIE, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, provide the general public and other Federal agencies with an opportunity to comment on proposed, revised, and continuing collections of information. This helps us assess the impact of our information collection requirements and minimize the public's reporting burden. It also helps the public understand our information collection requirements and provide the requested data in the desired format.


A Federal Register notice with a 60-day public comment period soliciting comments on this collection of information was published on May 26, 2017, (82 FR 24384). No comments were received.


We are again soliciting comments on the proposed ICR that is described below. We are especially interested in public comment addressing the following issues: (1) Is the collection necessary to the proper functions of the BIE; (2) will this information be processed and used in a timely manner; (3) is the estimate of burden accurate; (4) how might the BIE enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (5) how might the BIE minimize the burden of this collection on the respondents, including through the use of information technology.



Posted: July 28, 2017
More: grants, violence

The Indian Health Service (IHS), Office of Clinical and Preventive Services (OCPS), Division of Behavioral Health (DBH) is accepting applications for a three-year funding cycle, to continue the planning, development, and implementation of the Domestic Violence Prevention Initiative (DVPI). This program was first established by the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009, Public Law 111-8, 123 Stat. 524, 735, and continued in the annual appropriations acts since that time. This program is authorized under the authority of 25 U.S.C. 13, the Snyder Act, and the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, 25 U.S.C. 1601-1683. This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance under 93.933.


The DBH serves as the primary source of national advocacy, policy development, management and administration of behavioral health, alcohol and substance abuse, and family violence prevention programs. In 2015, DBH funded 57 Tribes, Tribal organizations, Urban Indian Organization (UIOs), and IHS federal facilities that participate in a nationally coordinated project to expand outreach and increase awareness of domestic and sexual violence and provide victim advocacy, intervention, case coordination, policy development, community response teams, and community and school education programs. The DVPI promotes the development of evidence-based and practice-based models that represent culturally appropriate prevention and treatment approaches to domestic and sexual violence from a community-driven context.



Posted: July 28, 2017
More: pamunkey, virginia

Notice is hereby given that Indian Health Service (IHS) is establishing the geographic boundaries of the Purchased/Referred Care Delivery Area (PRCDA) (formerly Contract Health Service Delivery Area or CHSDA) for the newly recognized Pamunkey Indian Tribe. The Pamunkey Indian Tribe's PRCDA is to be comprised of Caroline; Hanover; Henrico; King William; King and Queen; and New Kent Counties and the independent city of Richmond in the State of Virginia. The six counties and the one independent city listed are being designated administratively as the PRCDA for the Pamunkey Indian Tribe.


The IHS currently provides services under regulations in effect on September 15, 1987, and IHS republished at 42 CFR part 136, subparts A-C. Many of the newly recognized Tribes do not have reservations and either Congress has legislatively designated counties to serve as PRCDAs or the Director, IHS, exercised reasonable administrative discretion to designate PRCDAs to effectuate the intent of Congress for these Tribes. The Director, IHS, publishes a notice in the FR when there are revisions or updates to the list of PRCDAs, including the PRCDAs for newly recognized Tribes.



Posted: July 27, 2017
More: class iii, compacts, gaming, igra, squaxin island, washington

The Squaxin Island Tribe of the Squaxin Island Reservation and State of Washington negotiated the Fifth Amendment to the Tribal State Compact for the Class III Gaming between the Squaxin Island Tribe and the State of Washington governing Class III gaming; this notice announces approval of the Agreement to Amend Compact.


Section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) requires the Secretary of the Interior to publish in the Federal Register notice of approved Tribal-State compacts that are for the purpose of engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. See Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2701 et seq. All Tribal-State Class III compacts, including amendments, are subject to review and approval by the Secretary under 25 CFR 293.4. The Fifth Amendment to the Tribal State Compact for the Class III Gaming between the Squaxin Island Tribe and the State of Washington revises the definition section, allows for an additional gaming facility, and increases the number of gaming stations and wager limits. Patrons 18-21 years of age are prohibited from alcohol purchase or consumption. Primary responsibilities for conducting background investigations are identified. The Tribe will establish a Problem Gambling Program. The Fifth Amendment to the Tribal State Compact for the Class III Gaming between the Squaxin Island Tribe and the State of Washington is approved.



Posted: July 26, 2017
More: information collection

In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs is seeking comments on the renewal of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval for the collection of information for the Native American Business Development Institute (NABDI) Funding Solicitation and Reporting authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0178. This information collection expires September 30, 2017.


The Division of Economic Development (DED), within the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED), established the Native American Business Development Institute (NABDI) to provide technical assistance funding to federally recognized American Indian Tribes seeking to retain universities and colleges, private consulting firms, non-academic/non-profit entities, or others to prepare studies of economic development opportunities or plans. These studies and plans will empower American Indian Tribes and Tribal businesses to make informed decisions regarding their economic futures. Studies may concern the viability of an economic development project or business or the practicality of a technology a Tribe may choose to pursue. The DED will specifically exclude from consideration proposals for research and development projects, requests for funding of salaries for Tribal government personnel, funding to pay legal fees, and requests for funding for the purchase or lease of structures, machinery, hardware or other capital items. Plans may encompass future periods of five years or more and include one or more economic development factors including but not limited to land and retail use, industrial development, tourism, energy, resource development and transportation.


This is an annual program whose primary objective is to create jobs and foster economic activity within Tribal communities. The DED will administer the program within IEED; and studies and plans as described herein will be sole discretionary projects DED will consider or fund absent a competitive bidding process. When funding is available, DED will solicit proposals for studies and plans. To receive these funds, Tribes may use the contracting mechanism established by Public Law 93-638, the Indian Self-Determination Act or may obtain adjustments to their funding from the Office of Self-Governance.



Posted: July 26, 2017
More: class iii, compacts, gaming, rosebud sioux, south dakota

This notice announces the extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota.


An extension to an existing Tribal-State Class III gaming compact does not require approval by the Secretary if the extension does not modify any other terms of the compact. 25 CFR 293.5. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota have reached an agreement to extend the expiration date of their existing Tribal-State Class III gaming compact to January 28, 2018. This publishes notice of the new expiration date of the compact.



Posted: July 25, 2017
More: energy, fracking

On March 26, 2015, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) published in the Federal Register a final rule entitled, “Oil and Gas; Hydraulic Fracturing on Federal and Indian Lands” (2015 final rule). The BLM is now proposing to rescind the 2015 final rule because we believe it is unnecessarily duplicative of state and some tribal regulations and imposes burdensome reporting requirements and other unjustified costs on the oil and gas industry. This proposed rule would return the affected sections of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) to the language that existed immediately before the published effective date of the 2015 final rule.


On March 28, 2017, President Trump issued Executive Order 13783, entitled, “Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth” (82 FR 16093, Mar. 31, 2017), which directed the Secretary of the Interior to review four specific rules, including the 2015 final rule, for consistency with the order's objective “to promote clean and safe development of our Nation's vast energy resources, while at the same time avoiding regulatory burdens that unnecessarily encumber energy production, constrain economic growth and prevent job creation” and, as appropriate, take action to lawfully suspend, revise, or rescind those rules that are inconsistent with the policy set forth in Executive Order 13783. To implement Executive Order 13783, Secretary of the Interior Ryan K. Zinke issued Secretarial Order No. 3349 entitled, “American Energy Independence” on March 29, 2017, which, among other things, directed the BLM to proceed expeditiously in proposing to rescind the 2015 final rule. Upon further review of the 2015 final rule, as directed by Executive Order 13783, and Secretarial Order No. 3349, the BLM believes that the 2015 final rule unnecessarily burdens industry with compliance costs and information requirements that are duplicative of regulatory programs of many states and some tribes. As a result, we are proposing to rescind, in its entirety, the 2015 final rule.



Posted: July 25, 2017
More: privacy act

On January 24, 2017, the National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC) revised its Privacy Act regulations. That document included incorrect information regarding the NIGC's address and contained conflicting timelines for resolving appeals. This document corrects the final regulations.



Posted: July 24, 2017
More: lac du flambeau, nagpra, wisconsin

The Cincinnati Art Museum, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of sacred objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Cincinnati Art Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


At some time between the mid-1920s and mid-1930s, two cultural items were removed from the Lac du Flambeau Chippewa Reservation in Vilas County, WI. The two cultural items are two wooden pipe stems. The upper section of the first pipe stem (CAM accession number 1988.253) is carved into a spiral shape and trimmed with loom-woven beadwork. The lower section is flat, with a strip of beaver fur at each end. The upper section of the second pipe stem (CAM accession number 1988.256) is carved with spool and ovoid shapes that are decorated with brass tacks. The pipe is trimmed with beaver fur at its center. The lower section is flat with incised, linear abstract designs on one side. At an unknown date, the two pipe stems were acquired by Dr. Bernard S. Mason, along with other objects originating from the Lac du Flambeau Chippewa Reservation. Upon Dr. Mason's death in 1953, ownership of his collection of Native American objects was transferred to John L. Holden. In 1988, Mr. Holden donated a portion of this collection that included the two pipe stems to the Cincinnati Art Museum.


Museum accession, catalogue, and documentary records, as well as consultation with representatives from the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, indicate that the two cultural items are Chippewa, and are from the Lac du Flambeau Chippewa Reservation of Wisconsin. The two objects are illustrated as line drawings in Dr. Mason's book, Crafts of the Woods, South Brunswick and New York: A. S. Barnes and Co, 1973 (originally published in 1939), page 20, Figure 202C and Figure 202D. The pipes, combined with a ceremonial Warrior Drum, comprise an ensemble of sacred objects that are needed by traditional Lac du Flambeau Chippewa religious leaders for the practice of Native American religions by their present-day adherents.



Posted: July 24, 2017
More: nagpra, north dakota

The State Historical Society of North Dakota, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the State Historical Society of North Dakota. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


On an unknown date, an unknown number of cultural items were removed from an unknown site in an unknown location. In August of 2016, a bison skull was found in the Museum Division storage space. The cultural item was found in a box dating to the 1950s that was used for storage of items in the possession of the State Historical Society of North Dakota (SHSND), but never formally accessioned or cataloged into the museum collection. Museum opinion is that the bison skull was placed in the storage box in the 1950s, but no other provenance is available. There is a label in the box that reads: “Fragments of buffalo skull found on the site of the final Sun Dance held by the Teton Sioux, and believed to be the skull used in that ceremony as the red paint applied to the buffalo skull in the Sun Dance is discernable on the specimen.” The sacred object/object of cultural patrimony is the broken partial skull of an old bison.


The buffalo skull was identified by Standing Rock Sioux of North & South Dakota tribal archeologist Kelly Morgan as belonging to the Teton Sioux and/or Lakota Sioux of the Oceti Sakowin (Seven Council Fires) that make up what is often referred to as the “Sioux Nation.” Their first reservation land was negotiated under the Treaty of Traverse des Sioux in 1851, and then initially reduced under the Treaty of 1858. These treaties were unilaterally abrogated by the United States Government after the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, and Dakota people were force-marched and ethnically-cleansed from their Minnesota homeland in 1863. In 1873, the Standing Rock Indian reservation was established. The distinctive Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota identity is still pervasive at Standing Rock. The Standing Rock Sioux, as well as all other members of the Oceti Sakowin, practiced the seven sacred rites of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota nations. The Sun Dance is the third of the sacred rites, and is still practiced today. Skulls in the Sun Dance are used in the “Dragging of the Skulls” ceremony and as an altar in the dance. The red spot on the top of this bison's skull signifies that the skull was used in a Sun Dance ceremony.



Posted: July 24, 2017
More: museums, nagpra, washington

The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


In 1970, an unknown number of human remains and cultural items were removed from site 45AS8 in Asotin County, WA. Thirteen historic era burials were archeologically excavated from site 45AS8 as part of a highway relocation project. At that time, most of the human remains and associated funerary objects were reburied on the Nez Perce Reservation at the Old Spalding Cemetery in Spalding, ID. In 2013, the remaining 47 (unassociated) funerary objects that were determined to be from 45AS8 were located in storage at the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University. The 47 unassociated funerary objects are 8 lots of flakes; 2 nails; 3 lots of small unidentifiable bone fragments; 4 lots of glass beads; 23 lots of coffin fragments; 3 lots of metal fragments; and 4 lots of buttons.



Posted: July 20, 2017
More: information collection

In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, ED is proposing an extension of an existing information collection.


Abstract: The Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) of the U.S. Department of Education's (ED) Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) will use this data collection form to capture the performance data from grantees funded under the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services (AIVRS) program (CFDA # 84.250). RSA and ED will use the information gathered annually to: (a) Comply with reporting requirements under the Education Department General Administration Regulations (EDGAR) 34 CFR part 75.118, (b) provide information annually to Congress on activities conducted under this program, and (c) measure performance on the program in accordance with the program indicators identified in the Government Performance Result Act (GPRA). The proposed changes to the existing form will improve user friendliness, clarity of data questions, and accuracy of data reported. Since the ED no longer collects data regarding common measures, the entire section of the report that collects this data is deleted, further reducing burden. These revisions are not significantly different from the original collection, but are proposed to provide clarity, consistency, and usability. In many areas, the data element language has been modified with direct language instead of passive terminology.



Posted: July 20, 2017
More: nagpra, texas

The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Lake Meredith National Recreation Area, has corrected an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on June 18, 2001. This notice corrects the minimum number of individuals and number of associated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the correction of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Lake Meredith National Recreation Area, Fritch, TX. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from sites in Potter County, TX.


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