indianz.com your internet resource indianz.com on facebook indianz.com on twitter indianz.com on Google+ indianz.com on soundcloud
phone: 202 630 8439
Fredericks Peebles & Morgan LLP
Advertise on Indianz.Com
Home > News > Headlines

printer friendly version
Bid to lower Navajo blood quantum rejected
Friday, April 23, 2004

A proposal that could have doubled the enrollment of the largest tribe in the country was rejected on Thursday by the Navajo Nation Council.

Council delegate Ervin Keeswood sponsored the legislation to lower the tribe's one-fourth blood quantum requirement to one-eighth. Approval could have increased tribal enrollment from about 310,000 to more than 600,000.

But amid concerns of the potential impact on tribal services, the council in its final action of the session rejected Keeswood's legislation by an overwhelming vote. Only 18 delegates voted for it compared to 44 against.

Another delegate, LoRenzo Bates had sought to delay the proposal until the fall session so that more information could be collected. But that too was rejected by a vote of 26-37.

The Navajo Nation is already the largest tribe in the country in terms of enrollment. An increase in the rolls could have led to a greater share of federal funds but tribal leaders were worried the tribe might not be able to handle the influx.

Navajo Nation President Joe Shirley Jr. was one of those who spoke against the measure. Saying that the decision shouldn't be left to the council alone, he called for a referendum to go before the Navajo people.

"While the intent appears to be, that, by decreasing the blood quantum, there will be an increase in our population and thus, more federal dollars coming into the coffers," he said this week. "However, the consequence is that the Navajo Nation may face additional responsibilities to provide the newly enrolled members with rights, and access to the decreasing resources available from our Navajo Nation government."

Shirley wasn't convinced that more money would flow to the tribe either. He cited the Bush administration's budget plans, which call for reductions at the Bureau of Indian Affairs and only slight increases at the Indian Health Service.

"This scenario is not likely to change with the war going on and more and more monies being diverted to that cause," he said.

The one-fourth requirement has been part of Navajo law since 1951. Other tribes have adopted similar standards while some have none at all, choosing to base enrollment on lineal ancestry.

The second largest tribe in the country is the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Enrollment is not based on blood quantum but on the Dawes Roll, a list of Cherokee citizens complied in the late 1800s and early 1990s. Anyone who can show descent from a person on the roll is eligible for enrollment.

The Navajo Nation Council held its 20th spring session all this week. Delegates approved a wide range of legislation, including funding for Native American Studies at Rehoboth Christian School in New Mexico, a limited waiver of sovereign immunity for a loan from the Native American Bank and an audit of the Navajo Boys and Girls Club.

Relevant Links:
Navajo Nation Council - http://www.navajonationcouncil.org
Navajo Nation - http://www.navajo.org

Related Stories:
Navajo president wants public vote on blood quantum (4/22)
Navajo Nation may lower blood quantum requirement (4/19)

Copyright 2000-2004 Indianz.Com
More headlines...

Latest Headlines:

Tribes continue battles against drug companies amid a setback in court
National Congress of American Indians welcomes Secretary Zinke again
House subcommittee takes up bill aimed at improving tribal economies
Doug George-Kanentiio: Mohawk people must take action on marijuana
Mark Trahant: Battle over the budget grows as deficit spending explodes
Cronkite News: Children of immigrants eye permanent 'Dreamers' solution
Mary Annette Pember: Indian Health Service still lacks a permanent leader
Secretary Zinke refused to meet with National Park Service advisory board
Mary Kathryn Nagle debuts 'Sovereignty' play at theater in nation's capital
Nisenan Tribe back to square one after losing federal recognition lawsuit
Pokagon Band makes history with opening of first tribal casino in Indiana
Stillaguamish Tribe prepares for $60 million expansion of gaming facility
Tribes falling behind on schedule for controversial casino in Connecticut
Another tribal treaty rights dispute looms on the Supreme Court's docket
Senate Committee on Indian Affairs focuses on agribusiness opportunities
Doug George-Kanentiio: Native people are no stranger to Trump's ethnic slurs
Albert Bender: Indigenous community labels Trump an 'Indian Hater' in protest
Cronkite News: Trump slams program for children of undocumented migrants
Gyasi Ross: Everyone mad about Trump should have listened to Native people
Mary Annette Pember: Native women bring back traditional birthing practices
Uranium mining company pushed Trump administration to reduce Bears Ears
Narragansett Tribe plans lawsuit after being denied role in contested pipeline
Treaty tribes stunned as Supreme Court agrees to hear salmon passage case
House set to approve land 'reaffirmation' bill for Poarch Band of Creek Indians
Tim Giago: Indian Country in danger as long as Donald Trump remains in office
Native Sun News Today: 'Water Protectors' film heralds unsung Lakota heroes
Lornet Turnbull: President Trump again plays to his base with racist comments
Karuk Tribe getting closer to opening of long-awaited $35 million gaming facility
Tachi Yokut Tribe offers cheap gas and gaming machines at convenience store
Timbisha Shoshone Tribe solicits local input for off-reservation casino project
A historic moment as Congress approves first tribal recognition bill in decades
'Enough is enough!' -- Yet another tribe scores big victory in homelands case
Native Sun News Today: Sudden death of Indian inmate saves lives of others
Mark Trahant: Let's make 2018 the year we focus on policy instead of tweets
Cronkite News: White Mountain Apache water bill sidetracked in partisan fight
YES! Magazine: Healing from the trauma of sexual assault with #HealMeToo
Gyasi Ross: Struggles are the same for black people and indigenous people
Indian lawmaker in Minnesota governor's race discloses 'private' relationship
Osage Nation's 'Reign of Terror' gains renewed attention with book and film
Republicans stir drama by reviving contentious Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act
Native Sun News Today: Oglala Sioux Tribe asks citizens about constitution
James Giago Davies: Imagine what a genius could do for our reservations
The Conversation: What the 'California Dream' means to indigenous peoples
Secretary Zinke outlines nationwide reorganization of Interior Department
Longtime chairman of Forest County Potawatomi Community steps down
One reported dead and two injured after shooting on Morongo Reservation
Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribe moves forward with Class II gaming facility
Winnebago Tribe sees change after veteran lights sacred fire for his people
Keepseagle payments delayed as opponents take case to Supreme Court
Sen. Tina Smith from Minnesota joins Senate Committee on Indian Affairs
Mark Trahant: Trump loyalist and Choctaw citizen joins race for Congress
Native Sun News Today: Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe raises funds for water
Ivan Star Comes Out: We are still here with our language and culture intact
Cronkite News: Convicted former sheriff announces Senate bid in Arizona
Tribes upset after education official offered praise for 'Manifest Destiny'
Eastern Cherokees see strong support for Tennessee land-into-trust bill
>>> more headlines...

Home | Arts & Entertainment | Business | Canada | Cobell Lawsuit | Education | Environment | Federal Recognition | Federal Register | Forum | Health | Humor | Indian Gaming | Indian Trust | Jack Abramoff Scandal | Jobs & Notices | Law | National | News | Opinion | Politics | Sports | Technology | World

Indianz.Com Terms of Service | Indianz.Com Privacy Policy
About Indianz.Com | Advertise on Indianz.Com

Indianz.Com is a product of Noble Savage Media, LLC and Ho-Chunk, Inc.