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(06/30)

It is the best way to keep a lid on the spread of gambling in the state and ensure the state will continue to receive a cut of the Seminoles’ gambling operations.

(06/19)

The Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act restores parity to all sovereign governments across the United States.

(06/19)

Indian gaming today provides more than 1 million jobs, pays millions in local, state and federal taxes as well as supports local charities.

(06/18)

Here's hoping that Connecticut lawmakers continue to see the wisdom of giving the tribes at least one satellite near the Massachusetts border, to help keep at home Connecticut gambling dollars.

(06/11)

The governor has disappeared. The Legislature can’t agree on a basic budget, much less work out a new gambling compact with the tribe.

(06/09)

I know the machines at the Indian casinos are different, but how are they different from the Las Vegas machines?

(06/02)

Casinos won’t kill you, although they offer ample opportunity to hurt yourself.

(06/01)

With Florida lawmakers facing a big gap in the state budget as they prepare to reconvene for a special session, it would be irresponsible for them to walk away from the table games compact with the Seminole Tribe.

(06/01)

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy was still deciding this weekend whether to sign legislation approved early Friday that would lead to possibly opening a new tribal casino along the Connecticut-Massachusetts border.

(05/29)

After 200 years of genocide by the United States, enough is enough!

(05/26)

The gaming facility benefits only a few financially, not the Cayuga Nation as a whole, and comes at a great cost societally to both our people and our neighbors.

(05/22)

You can't blame the tribe for trying to protect its business interests, but that's the problem with cutting a classic sweetheart deal.

(05/21)

America still fights Indian wars, but today these battles center not around settlers pushing their homesteads onto tribal lands but around gambling.

(05/19)

The 1988 Indian Gaming Regulatory Act is very clear – the state of Kansas has an obligation to negotiate in good faith a gaming compact.

(05/18)

The debate in Sacramento over the legalization of online gaming, specifically Internet poker, appears to be moving forward.

(05/13)

From 2004 to 2006, Washington was transfixed by the revelations that several Indian tribes had paid exorbitant fees to then-uber lobbyist Jack Abramoff to stop other tribes from opening casinos.

(05/12)

State lawmakers are debating again whether to allow licensed gambling operations in California to launch online poker sites.

(05/11)

You can bet your last dollar that the Seminoles won't fold blackjack, baccarat and other table games easily.

(05/11)

Recent actions in Arizona and Indiana suggest that there is a new approach to local government opposition to Indian tribal applications for trust status of newly acquired land.

(05/08)

Why is Indiana being mean to the Indians again?

(05/05)

The Indian Wars still rage in Washington, fueled by the largest lobbying contracts the city has to offer.

(05/01)

The tribes and their allies want the state to bestow on them a privilege denied everyone else: the right to build a casino. This will strike most people as unfair.

(04/30)

If there must be Poarch Creek gambling, it might as well include card games. They certainly won't harm the public weal any more than electronic bingo already does.

(04/27)

The disparity between the Kickapoo on one hand and the two other Texas tribes has been the subject of discussion for years. Yet, nothing was ever really done to confront it and provide all tribes an equal opportunity to develop gaming.

(04/20)

Someone needed to stand up for the principle of the people's vote in 2002 authorizing tribal gambling compacts.

(04/15)

While the odds of a Mashpee Wampanoag casino opening in Taunton now appear slimmer than ever, how would a tribal casino affect a third state-licensed casino?

(04/13)

The hope of prosperity is evidenced in the success of less regulated and prosperous Native American tribe businesses in the state.

(04/13)

Rounding out the major economic impact of Tribes is the gaming industry. Jobs in food and beverage, lodging, and gaming operations are supported by this sector.

(04/10)

The great mystery of Connecticut's casino monopoly is why it lasted so long.

(04/08)

Montana is losing revenue because it does not allow table games, such as craps and roulette.

(04/07)

It's notable this year that the pari-mutuels, who've been ferocious competitors, have ended their 'circular firing squad' lobbying efforts and joined hands around a single call: a level playing field with the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

(03/31)

It’s the latest evidence that tribal gambling is very big business in Oklahoma and that money rolls from the tribes to the general economy.

(03/31)

Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun are not standing pat; they have joined forces to propose several casinos, placed strategically around Connecticut to thwart the results of encroachment.

(03/30)

Unfortunately, Texas is already experiencing a few of the consequences of gambling, such as the addictive qualities, exploitation of the poor and dependence on welfare.

(03/27)

As the State of Connecticut and its Congressional Delegation continue the premeditated genocide of the remaining three state-recognized tribes, we find it hypocritical of them to now want to open three additional casinos.

(03/24)

Florida should not become another Nevada with gambling casinos strung across the state, but that's the possible scenario with pending legislation in Tallahassee.

(03/18)

Fairness and equality should matter to all citizens of the New Mexico.

(03/18)

Muskegon County cannot afford the luxury of an Indian casino.

(03/16)

We do have plans to replicate in Florida what we have done in Alabama — create jobs and economic security, add to the tax base and fiscal strength of our state, and be good and charitable neighbors.

(03/12)

Absent the settlement agreement, the tribe would be free to develop its lands as it sees fit.

(03/11)

Tribe officials have said they will invest $180 million in the project and that they expect to create more than 1,200 new jobs.

(03/10)

The West Valley Resort represents a major economic boost for construction companies and workers who were hit so hard by the recession.

(03/09)

Don’t believe the spin that a massive Florida House gambling bill represents a 'contraction' in gaming.

(03/09)

The Menominee are our fellow Wisconsinites, they are our brothers and sisters; when opportunity is taken from them it is taken from all of us.

(03/05)

The appointment of Bobby Soper as president of the Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority this week represents fulfillment of a long-held goal of the Mohegan Tribe.

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